Your Parents Lied to You — & Twitter Knows All About It

People are sharing lies their parents told them on Twitter, and boy can we relate. The #LiesYourParentsToldYou has opened a Pandora’s box of what parenthood is about: love, patience, and lies.

While some of these lies could easily be justified (because let’s be honest, who would want a child to be awake all night long on Christmas waiting for Santa right at the door?) there are others that were absolutely mean (did your parents ever say, “come back here, I promise I won’t punish you” only to do just that?).

Of course, honesty is key when raising kids. We as parents must be straightforward with our children and explain issues to them in practical, accessible ways. After all, knowledge is power; it can help kids make better choices for their futures, and even guide them to be more empathetic toward others. But sometimes, a lie can save you quite a headache when you’re fielding awkward questions — and it might even prevent kids from hurting themselves. That’s the funny thing about the #LiesYourParentsToldYou Twitter thread: It makes it pretty clear that sometimes, the best solution really is a tiny white lie.

As parents, we don’t mean to be deceitful. We just want you to do the right thing. You know, whatever we think that is.

Here are some of the funniest, cruelest lies Twitter has debunked. Any of these sound familiar?  

I guess he won’t be trying pumpkin, chia, or sunflower seeds anytime soon.

Just wait until she becomes a grandma for star-shaped, crustless sandwiches.

We all believed in those 7 years of bad luck.

…and then we would have to wait through the never-ending “goodbye tour” of said house.

A tender way of saying “no,” right?

In other words: That lemon chicken from five days ago is still good.

Especially if the wind blows right in your face.

“Oh, sweetie, but you already spent that money.” Lies, all lies.

Don’t worry. This funny-looking green substance definitely isn’t broccoli soup.

We won’t tell your grandparents either.

Oh…it all makes sense now.

How about “we’ll get it on our way back”?

And this is why I was always scared of my mom’s hair.

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