Doctor dumps magazine from waiting room for featuring biracial family

Jul 21, 2015 at 4:53 p.m. ET
Image: Fuse/Getty Images

A physician in Tomball, Texas got a little more than he bargained for with the June issue of Houstonia Magazine.

Inside, the first page featured a full-size advertisement that depicted a biracial family of five. While most probably wouldn't bat an eye, this doctor appeared to have serious issues  — prompting him to write the company who used the ad and tell them how "disgusted" he was.

More than that, he pulled the magazine from his waiting area! Houstonia apparently also got a call from another customer who claims he "just can’t go for racial mixing." In fact, he was so offended by the ad that he canceled his subscription out of fear his children would see it.

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Wow. So much for progress?

Kudos do go to the Ashton Martini Group, the company who purchased the ad space, for featuring such a diverse family. An affiliate of the acclaimed Sotheby's real estate firm, their decision reiterates a "new normal" happening in our wonderful melting-pot of a society (here's a secret: it's been happening). And kudos to Scott Vogel, editor-in-chief of Houstonia for responding to these incidents on his magazine's website.

Rather than sweep issues of racism under the rug or bow to the complaints from customers, he decided to use his company's platform to address them head on. He's standing behind the add and against racism in America.

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That's what we need more of: businesses and businesspeople who refuse to back down when racist customers try to wield their influence. The customer is not always right.

No matter your personal preference when it comes to a life partner, it's important to come at other people's choices with respect and acceptance. Being close-minded can rob you greatly of the opportunity to learn from other cultures. It's so sad that sentiments like this still hold true in today's society, but hopefully with time comes more understanding and tolerance. Not every family will look the same as the traditional model from the past, and that's OK.

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