10 Plants that just won’t die

So you’re looking to add some plants to your home or garden. But there’s a catch: Most of what you try to grow ends up pathetically shrivelled and dead. Before you give up on gardening forever, check out these 10 hardy plants that even the most seasoned plant-killer can keep alive.

Succulents

Succulents are like the fish of the plant world — they really don’t need a lot of maintenance. While they love the sun, these hardy little desert plants are quite content to be left to their own devices. While they do best in the sun, there are also varieties that will grow in semi-shade. Here are three of our faves:

cacti

Cacti

You can’t get much more low maintenance than a cactus, and these little plants are quite a challenge to kill. They’re perfect for pots, tolerate drought and enjoy the sun (no surprises there). Best of all, there’s a whole range of colours and shapes to choose from. (bunnings.com.au, $8)

queens agave

Queens Agave

A popular succulent due to its attractive appearance, Queens Agave has thick green leaves and distinctive white markings. The leaves are smooth to touch but end in a thick black thorn. Keep your Agave in a sunny spot in well-draining soil. (lushplants.com.au, $5)

Crassula ovata Hummel's Sunset

Crassula ovata Hummel’s Sunset

This cute little succulent has brightly-coloured foliage in the winter. So you can look forward to hues ranging from green with a reddish outline, to yellow, red and pink. This plant can be grown as a pot plant or in the garden, but be sure to keep it in full sunlight. (lushplants.com.au, $6)

Maidenhair fern

Maiden Hair fern

These are a definite must if you’re looking for a resilient indoor plant. Just stick them in a pot and leave them in a place with filtered light, such as inside or on the verandah. Best of all, if your fern ends up shrivelled and dead, you can just cut it back 2-4 centimetres from the base, give it a good watering, add some fertiliser and — hey presto! — it will come back to life. (bunnings.com.au, $9)

Geraniums

geraniums

This gorgeous bloom will have you feeling like you’ve just returned from a splendid European vacation. Not only are Geraniums colourful all year round, they’re hardy, they are heat and drought-tolerant and can be grown in a garden or pot. Plant them in a sunny space and make sure you wait for the soil to dry between waterings. Then simply sit back and enjoy. (bunnings.com.au, $7)

Lucky bamboo

lucky bamboo

This bamboo is super low maintenance and can thrive indoors (out of direct sunlight) with the occasional drink of fresh water. Not only is it low maintenance, but lucky bamboo is a traditional Chinese gift that is said to attract many Feng Shui benefits such as happiness, health, love and abundance. We’re feeling zen already! (bunnings.com.au, $11)

Four o’clock flower

Four o’Clock Flower

This pretty plant is tougher than it looks. With flowers that open late in the afternoon (hence the name), four o’clock flowers have roots that hold water, making them drought-resistant. These bright-coloured blooms can be planted pretty much anywhere and, aside from regular pruning to avoid straggly bits, they are pretty low maintenance. (lushplants.com.au, $10)

Parlour palm

Parlour Palm

This indoor-friendly plant does perfectly well on its own, so it’s perfect for the neglectful plant owner. Parlour palms do well in both bright and low light and (hooray!) require very little water. They can grow to almost a metre, so they make a nice-looking plant for your home or office. (bunnings.com.au, $9)

SunPatiens

SunPatiens

We’re told that these bright blooms are actually a breakthrough in breeding, being the only series of impatiens that tolerates heat, humidity, sun, shade and rain. Horticultural advances aside, these are a great multi-purpose plant that you can put in your garden or in pots. They’re easy to maintain and just need to be fed with a slow-release fertiliser and watered well when first planted. (bunnings.com.au, $11)

Peace Lily

Peace Lily

If you’re looking for a great indoor plant, the Peace Lily may just be your best bet. It really doesn’t like direct sunlight and will grow best in a spot that is dark and shady. It’s easy to care for as well as nice to look at, with flowers starting off pale green and changing to snow white. Caution: Keep this one away from children and pets — it’s toxic! (lushplants.com.au, $10)

More on gardening

Best plants for a vertical garden
Grow your own herbs
5 Compelling reasons to develop your green thumb

Comments

Comments are closed.