Homemade Sun-Dried Tomatoes

Sun dried tomatoes add a gourmet element to pastas and salads, but their grocery store price tag is outrageous. They are so expensive, in fact, that you’d think the tomato-drying process is very difficult.



Sun dried tomatoes add a gourmet element to pastas and salads, but their grocery store price tag is outrageous. They are so expensive, in fact, that you’d think the tomato-drying process is very difficult. Truth is, it’s not. You can make sun-dried tomatoes fresh from your garden with minimal effort.

Sun-dried tomatoes are not necessarily dried in the sun. The USDA actually permits dehydrated or oven-dried tomatoes to be labeled as “sun-dried,” and there really is no difference in flavor. However, sun drying is a natural and free way to get the job done.

Any type of tomato may be dried, including grapes, Romas or heirlooms. You can remove the skin by boiling for a few seconds if you’d like, but it’s not necessary. cut the tomatoes into quarters and scoop away the seeds. Place the tomato pieces on wire racks on baking sheets. Season with kosher salt and spices if desired.

To oven-dry, roast the tomatoes on your lowest oven setting (around 150 to 200 F) for 10 to 20 hours. Sun dry on a hot day on the dashboard of your car. Park so your windshield faces south and receives tons of sunlight. This process will take two days, so bring them inside overnight.

You’ll recognize that your homemade sun-dried tomatoes are done when they have a leathery texture and are flexible, like a raisin or dried apricot. They should not have any moisture or leakage. Store the dried tomatoes in a zip-seal bag in the refrigerator or freezer.

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