Get fit with the paleo workout

One of the hottest new workouts actually gets inspiration from the olden days. Think way back to how our ancestors lived in the paleolithic era, and you’ve got the paleo workout. Here’s what it is and how it benefits you.

Woman doing chin-ups outdoors

There’re always new workouts designed to get us fit, such as Jukari Fit to Fly, Om yoga, piloxing, Zumba, hooping, and power plate, to name just a few. Combining two workouts into one or incorporating fun, new elements (such as circus acrobatics), the fitness industry is always looking for new ways to capture our interest when it comes to working out. But one of the workouts currently gaining ground actually harkens back to our ancestors: the caveman or paleo workout. It seems like they may have known best how to stay fit.

The paleo workout’s exercises are based on the way our bodies had to perform back in the caveman days — moves that were essential when it came to surviving in the wild. Back then, you may have had to sprint to escape dangerous prey, clamber up boulders on all fours and perhaps lift heavy objects such as rocks to build a shelter. Essentially, imagine what actions you’d have to perform to hunt, gather and make it in the caveman era, and this is what the paleo workout consists of. The main movements can be broken down into these seven actions:

  • squatting
  • bending
  • lunging
  • pushing
  • pulling
  • twisting
  • running

Swimming, running barefoot and deadlifting logs can also be considered components of the workout.

Rather than a mere bicep curl, which works out and defines only one muscle, the paleo workout involves full-body exercises that help develop your strength and cardio at the same time. Think how your heart rate increases and your arm and leg strength develops when climbing up a cliff as though you were running away from a bear, for example. It helps you develop endurance and power in a way that is much more functional in real life than the workout you’d get by using a gym machine.

The workout is ideally done outdoors, just like your ancestors lived, but it is also offered indoors at some gyms. It’s something you can even do on your own at any time in just about any space, which makes it ideal for someone who is pressed for time to work out. Create intervals based on the seven main movements above, using basic things you’d find in a typical park, for example.

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