5 Health myths that aren’t fact

Being that you adopted a vegan lifestyle, chances are you are exceptionally health-conscious. However, you may be following a few health-driven practices that are merely health myths that the media or perhaps other misled health-mongers have convinced you to be true. Here are five health myths that aren’t fact.
Being that you adopted a vegan lifestyle, chances are you are exceptionally health-conscious. However, you may be following a few health-driven practices that are merely health myths that the media or perhaps other misled health-mongers have convinced you to be true. Here are five health myths that aren’t fact.

5 Health myths unveiled

Health myth #1: You won’t get burned if you slather on the sunscreen

Fact: Sunscreen is imperative to protecting your skin from sun damage, but that doesn’t mean you won’t get sunburned if you apply it, especially if you only apply it once or lightly. Experts recommend applying a minimum of SPF 15 thirty minutes before going out in the sun, slathering it on thick, and reapplying it every two hours or after getting wet. Even better, avoid going out in the sun between 10am and 4pm, when the sun’s rays are the strongest, and seek shade when you are outdoors.

>>Sunscreen and sunblock smarts

Health myth #2: You will gain weight if you eat at night

Fact: It’s true that if you eat too much at night, you can gain weight. But no more so than if you consume excess calories earlier in the day. And don’t you find yourself wanting to nosh before bed on days you’ve skipped meals or over-restricted calories? You’ll feel better and have more energy if you spread your calories out from morning until evening, but eating at night doesn’t guarantee you’re going to pack on the pounds. Match your daily caloric intake to your daily needs and you’ll be able to maintain your weight even if you do nosh at night.

>>Journal your way to weight loss

Health myth #3: You need a calcium supplement especially because you’re following a vegan diet

Fact: I’m not knocking taking supplements as insurance that you meet your daily vitamin and mineral quota, but if you’re stressing out over your bone health since you started a vegan diet and are now popping vegan calcium chews for fear you’re going to fracture a bone, you’re likely doing more stress-related damage to your health than if you nixed the supplements altogether. Relax and reevaluate your vegan diet. You can get plenty of bone-boosting calcium from leafy greens, soy products, nuts, and even fruit.

>>Learn more about boning up on dairy-free calcium

Health myth #4: Vegans can’t exercise as intensely as meat-eaters

Fact: Did you ditch your hardcore workouts when you dropped whey protein shakes and beef steaks from your diet? Just because you aren’t wolfing down slabs of animal protein doesn’t mean you can’t train or perform like a top athlete. In fact, Brendan Brazier, bestselling author of The Thrive Diet and vegan since age 15, is a testimony that vegans make excellent athletes. Brazier is a top-notch Ironman triathlete and two-time Canadian Ultramarathon Champion. He’s also the founder of Vega, an award-winning line of whole food nutritional products. Stop holding back and start sweating to your fitness potential.

>>5 Super sources of protein for vegans

Health myth #5: You can’t find healthy vegan food at restaurants

Fact: If you are used to preparing wholesome vegan meals at home, chances are you will encounter less-than-healthy vegan meals when you dine out. However, the number of healthy vegan restaurants and restaurant menu offerings are growing at a rapid rate. Best yet, the Internet is your one-stop shop for finding vegan restaurants, reviews of vegan eateries, and suggestions for the best vegan restaurant meals. Don’t feel like you have to always eat at home for healthy vegan meals, simply do some research and even call your local restaurants to inquire about their vegan-friendly meals. Visit HappyCow.com for the largest database of vegan-friendly restaurants throughout the world.

>>The best vegan restaurants in the US

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