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Nicole Kidman Says ‘There’s No Right and Wrong’ When It Comes to Motherhood ‘Just Different Children’

She’s known for playing some of the most celebrated parts in Hollywood but, in a new interview for Tatler magazine, Nicole Kidman addresses her most complex role: motherhood. The Oscar-winning actress first became a mom when she was 20-something and married to Tom Cruise, just kicking off what would become an iconic career. Then, she became a mom again in her 40s. Does she have any wisdom about tackling motherhood at different stages of life? Stay put — Kidman is sharing her truth.

The actress sat down with Tatler at her Nashville home she shares with country singer husband Keith Urban and the couple’s daughters Sunday Rose, 11, and Faith Margaret, 9. And there, she addressed how she feels about motherhood and her experience over the years, she and Cruise are parents to kids Isabella, 27, and Connor, 24. “I think it’s just a journey,” she shared. “And the first thing is there’s no right and wrong. There’s just different children.”

Kidman went on to share some sage wisdom that was passed down to her from her grandmother along with her takeaway. “I once got this wonderful advice from my grandmother. She said, ‘Every child is given some adversity. Where you’re born. What you’re up against. Your parents get divorced,'” she said, adding, “There’s always going to be problems. And the greatest thing is that the love is enough.”

It’s Kidman’s hope that Sunday and Faith will recognize that love in the way their parents are raising them — they travel the world with their mom and dad for work — and not resent it.

“Who knows? When they’re older, they’ll probably think, ‘My parents dragged me around the world. I’m never leaving this one town.’ Kids can be quixotic. Kids can be perverse. And there’s nothing you love more. When that shift happens, and you [become a parent], it’s a cataclysmic change,” Kidman explained. “Everything shifts. That depth of love is unfathomable, and deeply painful, and extraordinarily joyful.”

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