Megan Fox & Brian Austin Green Once Held a Full Funeral for a Rollie Pollie Because, Kids

Ah, to be a parent! ‘Tis a stage of life for doing things you never thought you would. Megan Fox and Brian Austin Green threw a funeral for a rollie pollie after one of their sons squashed the arthropod on accident. So, yeah, the couple did what they had to do to restore their child’s happiness. And, in this case, that included lighting sage and honoring the deceased creature with a send-off to the spirit world.

Fox and Green spoke to UsWeekly at the PUBG Mobile #FIGHT4THEAMAZON Global Green benefit on Monday, explaining that part of their parenting philosophy is to underscore respect for nature. They share sons Noah, 7, Bodhi, 5, and Journey, 3, and Green has son Kassius, 17, from a previous marriage.

“I’m very specific about never harming animals,” Fox said. “We don’t step on ants. We don’t do things like that. We don’t rip flowers out of the ground, because we think they’re beautiful. I teach them that plants are sentient beings, they have feelings, thoughts and emotions. So, that’s what we’re doing.”

But once, the couple recounted, one of their sons inadvertently crushed a tiny creature. “My son accidentally stepped on a rollie pollie once and he was devastated,” said Fox, revealing, “We had a full funeral for it. We did a ceremony, we buried it, we lit sage, we released him back.”

That’s parenting for you! Plus, for Fox and Green, it’s all part of the way they’re raising their boys to be “very involved” with the environment. In addition to teaching respect for nature at home, they send the kids to an “organic, sustainable, vegan school” where the children learn to “plant their own food, they grow it, they harvest it, and they take it to local restaurants to sell it.”

According to Green, he and Fox — who’ve been married since 2010 — simply try to hold space for their kids’ growth in the best way they know how. “I think we just encourage them,” he told reporters on the red carpet. “We don’t encourage them to be themselves, we just encourage whoever they are.”

And, as a mother, I find that sort of brilliant. Of course we all want our kids to be true to who they are. But when they’re little, they’re still figuring that out — whoever they are at any given moment might not be who they are in five years. Or even five minutes. It’s impossible to know when they’ll slip into the “whoever” that is truest to themselves. So, Fox and Green’s philosophy of just offering unconditional encouragement sounds like solid logic.

Plus, it sounds like they throw one heck of a rollie pollie funeral.

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