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Is Chrissy Metz’s Emotional Instagram a Sign She Broke Up with Boyfriend Hal Rosenfeld?

Instagram can be many things: a modern-day photo album, a business platform and even a public diary. Last night, a certain This Is Us star posted a long, emotional Instagram caption about change, growth and relationships. It all begs the question: Did Chrissy Metz and boyfriend Hal Rosenfeld break up? Metz and Rosenfeld made their relationship public back in November 2018 and appeared on the Golden Globes red carpet together two months later. Now, Metz is posting about how the “honeymoon phase” always ends and how she’s working her way to “integrated love.” What does it all mean?

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I’m learning. I’m learning to be truly open. To see another perspective. To love differently. To change. To evolve. To trudge. If nothing changes, nothing changes.❤️ Thank you for this, @mindfulmft ・・・ And sometimes we walk away and sometimes we choose to allow love to expand into a place often unvisited. Integrated love is messy, and vulnerable, it demands us to see our partners as flawed (ie imperfect) and to allow them to see the same of us. The quirks that were once “so cute” are actually now annoying, you follow? It requires difficult conversations, transparency, a willingness to stand shoulder to shoulder with one another. Integrated love asks us to to do the work to heal together. It asks us to reinvent that which came easily in the beginning, all while asking us to transition through life stages and phases together. It asks us to ebb and flow with the trials and tribulations that life throws our way. It asks us to experience loss together, to grieve together, to celebrate each other together and encourage each other’s growth. The honeymoon phase is a beautiful phase of relationships, and…it ends. It doesn’t mean we can’t prioritize novelty and adventure, but we also ought to acknowledge this shift that happens in all our relationships and begin talking about what WILL happen and how we can prepare ourselves for it instead of romanticizing the honeymoon phase and then not knowing what to do once we have to integrate. So, open up your awareness. If you’re not partnered and find yourself partnered at some point, remember this. If you’re in the honeymoon phase, great…and open your heart to what integration may look like with that person. You won’t want to integrate with everyone, and that’s okay. That’s truly where we choose WHO we want to stand with. And, if you’re deep into a relationship and feel disconnected, explore what parts of your partner you might be rejecting and where you might feel rejected, too. If you can bring that convo forward, or share this post and start a discussion about how to strengthen integrated love, I would love for you to do that. That’s all for now. #mindfulmft

A post shared by Chrissy Metz (@chrissymetz) on

The photo Metz posted is a quote from Vienna Pharaon, a licensed marriage and family therapist in NYC. In her caption, Metz thanks Pharaon and offers her own reflection: “I’m learning. I’m learning to be truly open. To see another perspective. To love differently. To change. To evolve. To trudge.” So far, this doesn’t seem too breakup-y — more like Metz is in a transitional moment in her life. When she starts talking about relationships specifically, though, things get a little dicey: “Integrated love is messy, and vulnerable, it demands us to see our partners as flawed (ie imperfect) and to allow them to see the same of us. The quirks that were once “so cute” are actually now annoying, you follow? It requires difficult conversations, transparency, a willingness to stand shoulder to shoulder with one another.”

For anyone who’s been in a long-term relationship, what Metz is describing will sound familiar. She clarifies the feeling anyway in the following paragraph, adding “the honeymoon phase is a beautiful phase of relationships, and…it ends.” Metz feels it’s important, even during the honeymoon phase, to be preparing for the next stage — too often, we’re left “not knowing what to do once we have to integrate.” For Metz, “integrating” is the real joining of two peoples’ lives, when you accept the good and the bad in someone and decide you want to handle life’s “trials and tribulations” together.

Metz asks with an open call for readers to “open up [their] awareness.” The final few lines are perhaps most troubling for the state of her relationship with Rosenfeld, as she posits the following hypothetical: “if you’re deep into a relationship and feel disconnected, explore what parts of your partner you might be rejecting and where you might feel rejected, too.” She encourages her readers to start tough discussions, and to reflect meaningfully on what they truly want. “You won’t want to integrate with everyone,” she writes, “and that’s okay.”

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