Heather Locklear Is Officially Getting the Help She Needs

Heather Locklear has had a really difficult time in recent months. After she was arrested for allegedly attacking emergency personnel who responded to a domestic disturbance call at her home in June, she was hospitalized for psychiatric evaluation. Now, Us Weekly reports that Locklear is getting long-term treatment for mental health and other issues, which will hopefully help her and her family move forward and heal.

More: Heather Locklear Reportedly Hospitalized for Psychiatric Evaluation

According to Us, Locklear is set to undergo a 14-day treatment plan, but one source told the outlet that it "may be longer." They said, “Heather has a pretty big team giving her support. The family is hopeful this time around that she will get better whereas the many times before they were not.”

Following Locklear's arrest, the source said, “When she got out of jail she was supposed to voluntarily go in that day to get evaluated. But you can’t get evaluated until you do a detox so she was supposed to do that and she didn’t.”

Us reports that, per police, Locklear was "extremely intoxicated" and "very, very uncooperative" on June 24 when her mother called 911 because of Locklear's erratic behavior. She was arrested on two counts of misdemeanor battery. Her hospitalization came from concerns that she had taken too much of her prescription medication. 

"There was no crime, only a medical issue," police told Us Weekly in June. Us reports that Locklear was also arrested for a dispute with her boyfriend in February after which she returned to rehabilitative treatment; Locklear has struggled with substance abuse issues for several years, repeatedly going in and out of rehab.

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Hopefully, this new treatment plan will address her mental health issues and help her get back on track. Substance abuse and mental health are serious struggles that deserve dedicated treatment and plans for recovery. We wish Locklear and her family the best as they move forward.

If you're considering suicide or fear you may become suicidal, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 24-7 at 1.800.273.TALK (8255). If you're worried about someone you love, visit SuicidePreventionLifeline.org.

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