Paris Hilton Almost Lost Her $2 Million Engagement Ring Forever

Mar 26, 2018 at 7:28 a.m. ET
Image: Rachel Murray/Getty Images

I've never been engaged, so I can only imagine what it's like to sport a super-expensive piece of jewelry — an engagement ring — on a daily basis, and let me tell you something. Imagining all the money sitting on my hand kinda gives me the cold sweats. That is a lot of pressure to keep something that beautiful and meaningful safe and not lose track of it at any point in time. In fact, imagining losing an engagement ring and the heart-stopping chill that would likely pass through me the minute I realized it's gone might be even worse than imagining wearing an engagement ring at all.

More: Paris Hilton's Wedding Is Turning Into a Bidding War

All this is to say that I have literally no idea how Paris Hilton kept even the faintest modicum of composure (compared the panic attack I'd likely have) when, according to Page Six, she realized she'd lost her $2 million engagement ring in a Miami club over the weekend. That's right. Homegirl reportedly lost an engagement ring worth more money than I am likely to ever see in my entire life. While it sounds like an honest-to-goodness accident, this entire incident is an emotional roller coaster from start to finish.

As Page Six reports, Hilton was in Miami for the weekend both partying and appearing at the SLS Hotel to show off her DJing skills as part of Miami Music Week. Before Hilton did any of the DJing, she was reportedly dancing along to British DJs Above & Beyond with her fiancé, Chris Zylka at the former RC Cola factory (I can't believe I just typed that sentence, people) when her $2 million ring parted ways with her hand and disappeared for a good, long while.

More: Paris Hilton Already Wins the Most Extra Marriage Proposal Award for 2018

As a witness told Page Six: "Paris was dancing with her hands in the air, and the next minute her giant ring had flown off. She was really panicked as the venue was packed and very dark, it was the early hours of the morning and it was crazy in there."

A thorough search was reportedly led by a very calm Zylka and the ring was finally recovered. The kicker, though, is where they actually found the ring: "Miraculously they found the ring in an ice bucket two tables down," the witness reported back to Page Six. "It was amazing that they managed to even see that huge diamond in an ice bucket. Paris cried with relief when it was safely back on her finger." Thankfully, the night didn't have to end in tears — although some were understandably shed by Hilton during the short time she thought it was gone forever.

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With the ring safely recovered, Hilton and Zylka reportedly went back to partying the night away, and the following evening, on Saturday, Hilton went through with her own set at the SLS Hotel. She even posted some shots of the event (see the above Instagram photo set) and if you look carefully, you'll see her epic engagement ring safely back on her hand. Let's hope Hilton's epic engagement ring stays put from here on out because this whole "losing a wildly expensive engagement ring in a packed, dark nightclub" business is basically panic attack material.

More: Paris Hilton & Chris Zylka Are Doing More Than Just Moving In Together

If you recall, Zylka proposed with that epic engagement ring back in January while the pair were on vacation in Aspen, Colorado. The engagement made headlines, not only because of the ring, which is truly just a massive diamond perched on the slimmest, most beautiful band, but also because Zylka proposed on a mountaintop. The epic proposal seemed to set the tone for what might be the most extravagant trip to the altar too. Shortly after Hilton announced her engagement, reports came in that the couple was thinking of having multiple weddings in multiple exotic locations, which feels pretty on-brand as far as Hilton is concerned.

The couple is still in the early stages of their engagement, but it's hard to argue this hasn't been one of the more eventful celebrity engagements in recent memory.

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