A New Royal Tell-All Reveals the Queen's Shady Side

Mar 21, 2018 at 1:02 p.m. ET
Image: Chris Jackson/Getty Images

It really should come as no surprise that the delightfully sassy Queen Elizabeth II is capable of throwing some major shade. And since we already know the queen was not the biggest fan of her son Prince Charles' second wife, Camilla Parker-Bowles, now the Duchess of Cornwall, it should come as no surprise the duchess was the recipient of some royal salt from the queen.

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In a new book about the royal family, journalist Tom Bower does not shy away from the often-icy relationship between Elizabeth and Camilla, even going so far as to call the animosity between them a "Cold War."

And the book, entitled Rebel Prince: The Power, Passion and Defiance of Prince Charles, even details a night when the queen had a drink or two too many and let fly her real feelings about Camilla, royal decorum be damned. The event took place at Balmoral Castle in the summer of 1998 (a year after Princess Diana died) after the queen had downed "several martinis."

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"[Charles] asked that she soften her antagonism so he could live openly with Camilla. His hope was that the Queen, who rarely interfered, would at least not directly forbid it," an excerpt read. "But on that evening she'd had several martinis, and to Charles's surprise she replied forcefully: she would not condone his adultery, nor forgive Camilla for not leaving Charles alone to allow his marriage to recover. She vented her anger that he had lied about his relationship with what she called 'that wicked woman', and added: 'I want nothing to do with her.'"

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TBH, that's cold as hell, but we'd still hang out with the queen on martini night. And eventually, things warmed up, because the queen gave her official approval before Charles and Camilla married in 2005. All's well that ends well, right?

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