Sorry ladies, you won't see Jake Gyllenhaal's junk in Nightcrawler

Nov 4, 2014 at 9:23 a.m. ET
Image: Alberto Reyes/WENN.com

Jake Gyllenhaal stopped by HuffPost Live on Monday to discuss the lack of on-screen action in his latest film, Nightcrawler, and just why that is.

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Yes, we're sorry to disappoint you, but if you were planning to watch the creepy thriller and ogle at Gyllenhaal's hotness and view intimate scenes, it's just not going to happen.

There is one scene in the movie where Gyllenhaal's character, Lou Bloom, manages to proposition another character, played by Rene Russo, into having sex with him. However, none of it is shown on the screen. And HuffPost Live's Ricky Camilleri wanted to ask Gyllenhaal and the film's director Dan Gilroy why they decided to exclude that scene.

"I can tell you that financiers who wanted to put up the money if we put the sex scene in," Gilroy revealed. "I specifically said 'no' because there's nothing we can show that could match what you're imagining behind closed doors."

So, just thinking about Gyllenhaal's creepy character in the bedroom is enough, apparently.

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However, one film Gyllenhaal did star in that had sex scenes was Brokeback Mountain. The critically acclaimed film saw Gyllenhaal star as a ranch hand named Jack Twist, who becomes involved in a sexual relationship with another herder, Ennis Del Mar, who was played by the late actor Heath Ledger.

For many, Brokeback Mountain was a film that changed Gyllenhaal's career, and he still has fond memories about it.

"It was this little movie, that we made with this master filmmaker, and the whole cast was just in awe to be working with Ang Lee and on a story that we all thought was really beautiful. We didn't know how far it was going to go, and then it just took off, " the actor told HuffPost Live.

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"It's become something beyond what any of us could imagine. That film lives in its own space. It's one of those films that's really no longer mine, it's everyone's."

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