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How to create an educational bedroom

Kim Grundy is a mom, writer, expert laundry folder and sandwich maker, not necessarily in that order. Raised in Oklahoma, she is now a West Coast gal and lives in California with her husband and two sons, along with one dog, two fish (oo...

Bedrooms for brainiacs

Did you know you can create an educational bedroom for your child that helps foster a love of learning? Find out how to design and decorate a space for your kids that is fun and comfortable, yet also stimulates their minds.

Boy studying in bedroom

The first step in creating an educational bedroom is to keep it clean and organized. "Kids are very easily over-stimulated and that creates challenges in focusing and receiving new information. An organized room will help keep kids focused on the task at hand, teach them to take care of their belongings, and keep parents sane, too," says interior designer and mom Sarah Soler.

Use Feng Shui to enhance learning

DeAnna Radaj, author of Feng Shui for Teens, recommends using Feng Shui to create a bedroom for learning. She says to start by paying attention to the colors of the room. "Use the color blue to help with mental tasks. It is used to 'activate' the knowledge area in Feng Shui," she says. What color should you avoid? "Yellow is the hardest color for the eye to break down and causes 'stress' when the eye comes across it."

She recommends creating an efficient work space, called the "Knowledge Area." According to the principles of Feng Shui, you must first find the right spot in the bedroom. "This is the closest left corner when standing in the entryway of the room looking in. Place your child's desk here, facing into the room if possible, not against the wall as this creates 'hitting the wall' when studying or problem solving," she says.

Get your kids involved

Find out what your child is interested in and decorate his or her room accordingly. For instance, if your child has shown an interest in astronomy, decorate the room with posters of the planets, telescopes, and stars. If your child has shown a love of art, pick out reprints by famous artists to display and create an art table stocked with supplies.

Bobby DePorter, founder of SuperCamp and author of, The Seven Biggest Teen Problems,  recommends that parents pay attention and discover if their child's learning style is visual, auditory, or kinesthetic (hands-on), and provide them with study aids that match their preferred way of learning.

Make sure you keep their room well-stocked with books, toys, and games that will promote learning. DePorter recommends parents get their kids fully involved by taking them shopping and letting them pick out furnishings, posters, calendars, and other materials they need.

Affirmation Signs

"Positive [reinforcement] signs can help remind a student's subconscious mind of his or her potential to learn. You and your kids can make some signs that contain affirmations. When you make the signs, use lots of color (our brains love color!)," says DePorter.

Some examples of affirmation signs include:

  • EVERYONE HAS THE RESOURCES TO BE SUCCESSFUL
  • I BELIEVE IN MYSELF
  • EVERYTHING I DO DESERVES MY BEST EFFORT
  • EVERY CHALLENGE OFFERS A GIFT
  • I AM UNIQUE AND VALUABLE
  • I AM RESPONSIBLE
  • I CAN LEARN THIS!

Display their accomplishments

Whether it is an A plus paper or artwork, make a point to display their work in their room and throughout the house. "We have a clothesline on the wall where we clip all new works of art. He is proud of what he has done and shows it off to guests. Children need encouragement and support in their achievements," says Soler.

More design ideas for children's spaces

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