Your baby this week
21 weeks pregnant

The only way to drive

So do you really need to wear a seatbelt during pregnancy? They aren’t very comfortable, they can be awkward to use when your belly is huge, and seem to don’t fit very well — not to mention that a lot of pregnant women worry that the belt itself could injure the baby in the event of a car crash.

But doctors, researchers and accident investigators all agree: The best way for an expectant mama to protect her baby in utero is to protect herself. So when you’re on the road, wear your seatbelt every time — and that means throughout your entire pregnancy (and even if it’s a little uncomfortable sometimes).

>>> Should you wear a seat belt during pregnancy? If so, how?

In your car


In the know

Your baby's skin is growing from two layers: the epidermis (on the surface) and the dermis (the deeper layer). Vernix, the white substance that protects and covers the baby's skin before it is born, is now being secreted by the glands in the skin. By the time the baby's born, most of this waxy coating will probably have disappeared (though some remnants will be found in the folds of the skin).

Find out more: What your brand new newborn baby will look like


Baby boy

X marks the spot

For the cutting edge in baby names, look no further than the letter X! The best part is that we don't mean only names that begin with the letter X -- names that contain an X are just as cool as those that begin with it. X names often sound very creative and have a unique sound. Check out our list of the coolest X names for both boys and girls!


Feeling blue?

People often think of pregnancy as a special time when women feel biologically complete and insulated from the sadness in the surrounding world. And it is special.

The truth is, though, that the rates of depression in pregnant and non-pregnant women are very similar. If you are pregnant and depressed, from this you know that you are not alone, and that many women have gone through difficult times while pregnant, shed many tears, and had healthy, wonderful babies at the end. Click here to read more.


Looking ahead

It's a subject that pregnancy books tend to gloss over and childbirth educators too often ignore: exactly how your body will feel after a cesarean birth. It can be impossible to predict ahead of time whether or not you will be delivering your baby via cesarean section, therefore, it's important to arm yourself with the facts before you go into labor.

One thing to expect: For starters, it takes longer to bounce back after a cesarean. A C-section is major abdominal surgery. Consequently, there's a fair bit of healing involved. In fact, it takes approximately six months for your incision to fully heal. You can expect to feel some numbness in the area until your nerves have a chance to regenerate (something that typically happens six to nine months after the delivery).

Cesarean recovery: What nobody tells you

How to manage pain after cesarean

How will I feel after a c-section?