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10 holiday traditions from across the world your kids will love

Make your kids holidays bright with new global traditions

It's important that every family creates holiday traditions they take great pride in, but it's equally important to learn about the rich customs and celebrations that take place in different cultures.

Teach your kids about these amazing traditions from around the world. You'll be surprised at how much it enriches your family's own celebration.

Hanukkah in Israel

Jewish people all over the world observe Hanukkah, but perhaps there is not a more brilliant celebration than in Israel. The eight-day holiday, which lands on different dates in December every year, marks the successful Jewish rebellion over the Greeks. The focal point of celebration is the menorah, a branched candelabrum, and most homes have many. Each night, one candle is lit and gifts are often given to children, games are played and food is enjoyed. Children in Israel even get a week off from school.

More: 16 Adorably crafty holiday gifts kids can make themselves

New Year's Eve in Ecuador

In this South American country, a family dresses up a straw man representing the old year. Family members make a will for the straw man that lists all of their faults. At midnight, they burn the straw manin hopes their own faults disappear too.

Kwanzaa in the U.S.

Kwanzaa is a weeklong celebration honoring African-American culture. It was first celebrated in 1966 and is one of the fastest growing holidays. A Kwanzaa celebration often includes singing, drumming and a selection of readings such as the African pledge or parts of African history.

More: The baby names guaranteed to land on Santa's naughty list

Omisoka in Japan

In Japan, Omisoka, or New Year's Eve, is the second most important holiday of the year, following New Year's Day, the start of a new beginning. Japanese families gather for a late dinner around 11 p.m., and at midnight, many make visits to a shrine or temple. In many homes, there is a cast bell that is struck 108 times, symbolizing desires believed to cause human suffering.

Next: Ta Chiu in Hong Kong

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