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Homework help tips for every age

Kim Grundy is a mom, writer, expert laundry folder and sandwich maker, not necessarily in that order. Raised in Oklahoma, she is now a West Coast gal and lives in California with her husband and two sons, along with one dog, two fish (oo...

Guide to homework success

Help your child shoot to the top of his class with our homework help tips for kids in kindergarten, elementary, junior high and high school. Depending on your child’s age, there are techniques you can use to help them learn new skills, stay focused and excel in school.

mom helping daughter with homework

You can help your child stay focused and excel with his homework and in school, using various ways at various ages. "There are many different approaches and resources available to parents who want to help their child," says expert tutor and co-founder of "Parent Tested Parent Approved" online interactive tutoring service Virtual Nerd, Leo Shmuylovich. Check out his tips for homework success at every age.

Homework tips for Kindergarten

This is your child's first experience with homework. Here how to make the most of it:

  • Illustrate concepts in the real world: Students may not be able to verbalize math concepts at this age, but it is helpful to illustrate concepts with real-world objects. So, for example, ask them to give you three potato chips or count the cars in the parking lot. Counting pennies or the number of dots on dice is good practice as well.
  • Use games and puzzles that are age-appropriate: Reinforce what they are learning at school while keeping it fun! There are some fantastic online games and resources that are engaging and educational; check out www.Dreambox.com and www.Funbrain.com.

Homework tips for Elementary and Junior High School

  • Practice math in real life: Students over the age of 10 generally have the ability to calculate tips, trip durations, calculate change from a retail transaction and other real-world math problems.
  • Use manipulatives: "Manipulatives" are items you can count or physically work with, such as pennies, M&Ms or toy soldiers. Consider going shopping at your local teacher supply store; children are frequently motivated to use the same manipulatives that they use at school. If you make manipulatives available to your child, she can explore mathematical concepts at her own pace and skill level.
  • Practice makes perfect: Ask the teacher for extra worksheets and check your local bookstore for workbooks by course if your child needs to work more practice problems.

Homework help for High School

  • Reduce test-taking anxiety: If your child gets good grades on homework but scores poorly on tests, it may be anxiety-related. Simulate the high-stakes test environment by asking him to solve problems in a defined period of time without the help of his book or computer.
  • Make your child the teacher: Ask your child to explain the concept to you. If she can explain it to you, then she can work the problem.
  • Tap online resources for assistance: If your child doesn't know a rule or concept within a larger concept, use online resources to review or teach a concept. Sometimes hearing something explained in a different way can make big a difference.

Tell us: How do you help your child study? Comment below!

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