What would you like to know?
Share this Story

Summer camp visiting day primer

Jill Tipograph is the only independent summer planning expert, founder of EverythingSummer.comand the author of Your Everything Summer Guide. She is passionate about identifying and designing the right summer experiences for kids, teens,...

Camp chatter: Visiting day

Visiting Day at summer camp is a day eagerly awaited by both parent and child. The date is foremost in your mind, yet it signifies that camp is halfway over(boo hoo!), in most cases. You are looking forward with great anticipation, but are you ready to make this day a success?

Parents visiting summer camp

Become familiar with the details

 

 

 

 

Top 21 summer camps

Camp: Finding the best fit

Packing tips for overnight camp

Connect with kids at camp

[ More about summer camps! ]

Make sure you are completely aware of the camp's visiting day or parents' weekend policies, including the following:

 

  • Arrival and departure times.
  • Parking (you may be walking a far distance, and it is often available on a first arrival basis).
  • Is the day pre-planned, full of scheduled activities, or are activities open choice? If so, have your child sign-up ahead of time for popular areas (e.g. water skiing, tennis, wall climbing). Tip: Seating can be limited so bring easy-to-carry folding, stadium or camp chairs.
  • Is lunch served, or do parents bring a picnic lunch? (be sure to check food/allergy policies before bringing foods into camp).
  • Are you allowed to take your child out of camp and, if so, at what time must he/she be back? Most kids love this option, so be sure to see them in a few activities before you leave (camp return is often a quick drop-off, sometimes at a different location).

What are you permitted to bring your child at camp?

 

 

 

 

Top 21 summer camps

Camp: Finding the best fit

Packing tips for overnight camp

Connect with kids at camp

[ More about summer camps! ]

Favorite foods of your child are often popular for visiting day, but some foods may be restricted (e.g. food allergies, animals) so be sure to check with the camp first.

Tip: Most food is removed within 24-48 hours, so do not bring enough for days on end. Leftover food is usually donated to food shelters in the area.

Gift items should be thoughtful and made for sharing. Do not overdo this and remember that camp itself is a gift. These should be more of a token nature, fun and things an entire bunk can play with.

Tip: Most camps do not allow bunk gifts (e.g. an item for each child) to minimize competition; again please check with your camp about its policy. A great resource for camp gifts is gottagreatgift.com.

What about Fido? Pets may not be welcome. Prepare your kids if this is the case.

Next page: Should siblings and other family members come? >>

1 of 3
Comments
Recommended for You
Hot
New in Parenting
Close

And you'll see personalized content just for you whenever you click the My Feed .

SheKnows is making some changes!