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Parental Advisory: Mom jokes might just be worse than mom jeans

STFU Parents creator Blair Koenig is a writer and humorist who is in a love-hate relationship with the internet. She writes the STFU, Parents blog, which has been featured in outlets including CNN, Good Morning America, The Today Show, T...

Sorry, Mom, here's what the rest of us think of your 'hilarious' kid

Welcome back to Parental Advisory, where I answer all your social media and IRL parenting etiquette questions. This week, let's talk about the parents who post "funny" anecdotes about their kids... All. The. Time.

More: The '90s were awesome, so here's how to parent like they're back

Question:

Usually STFU, Parents is about people who "used to be fun, but now they have a baby." My BFF has a toddler and is still fun (yay!). Her posts are funny, topical and smart — and while initially it was cute and ha-ha, is it possible that even if talking about your kid is disguised by funny quips, it's still kind of annoying and "you used to be fun, but now you have a baby"?

Sincerely,

Secretly Annoyed But Still Love My BFF


Answer:

To answer your question in one word: Yes. It's possible for a parent (especially a parent of young kids) to be funny while also being kind of annoying. But I think you already know the answer to that question, SABSLMBFF. What you're really asking is why is this happening and maybe also what can you do about it. We all have friends — parents and non-parents — whose identities morph on the internet. For whatever reason, their IRL selves don't shine through in their posts.

This could be because you find their posts funnier than they are in real life (bonus!) or much darker than they are in real life (depressing). Some people have a strong sense of self in real life, but they struggle to capture that essence online. I've thought a lot about this over the years, from the ways I struggle with my own identity online, to seeing my friends and family in a new light via their online personas, to recognizing that people are always changing and growing, and the ways we share ourselves on the internet will also always be changing. Even our online identities shift over time. The internet has become a true extension of our real-life selves, and who we are online matters now.

Up next: STFU breaks it down real world-style

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