Share this Story

A travel guide to Scotland

Claire is an aspiring nutritionist (and soon to be culinary student) with a serious addiction to bacon, wine, goat cheese and online shopping. She is recently married to a social media guru who loves *almost* everything she conjures up. ...

Where to play & stay in this magical country

Some vacations you remember fondly. Some vacations slip your mind as the years pass. And then some vacations stick with you, change you and completely transform the way you view the world. If you're looking for a vacation like that, embark to the magical, lush, ever-changing wonderland of Scotland.

Where to play

Downtown Edinburgh

If you're looking for a bustling city that still has the enchanting castles and historical architecture you crave, spend a few hours in Edinburgh. The first stop should be the Edinburgh Castle. Although the body of the castle is only 100 years old (rebuilt after sieges and takeovers), St. Margaret’s Chapel on the grounds dates back to the late 11th century. In addition to the sweeping views of the city from the castle walls, you can also see the crown and jewels of Scotland in the Crown Room, which date back to the 14th and 16th centuries.

After the castle, grab a cab to the royal mile, which is full of shops, pubs, restaurants and historical buildings. For the best haggis in Edinburgh, dine at the Witchery by the Castle. For a more laid-back pub atmosphere, check out the World's End pub. The pub is aptly named because it lies on the wall that was built in the 15th century to protect Edinburgh. If you're a music junkie, stop off the royal mile to Cockburn Street, which is filled with boutiques and old-school record stores. Don't leave without a stop at Cadenhead's Whiskey Shop, which has an unbeatable selection of Scotch whiskey.

The Sterling Castle

The Stirling Castle

Located in the town of Stirling, right in between Glascow and Edinbugh sits the stunning 14th century Stirling Castle. This is one of the largest and most important castles in the history of Scotland and was home to some to several Scottish Kings and Queens, like Queen Mary of the Scots, 1543. The castle sits on top of Castle Hill, an intrusive craig, which forms part of the Stirling Sill geographical formation. There are several key sights to see while touring the castle, like the 15th cenutry outer defenses, the 15th century forework (the entryway of the castle), the 14th century King's Old Building (shown above) and the brightly colored Great Hall, which represents the first example of Renaissance-influenced royal architecture in that country. Tickets cost £13 to view.

Isle of Lewis

Isle of Lewis

The Isle of Lewis is located on the northern part of Lewis and Harris and is the largest island of the Western Isles or Outer Hebrides of Scotland. Although the Isle of Lewis is home to many amazing sites, it's most famous for the Callanish Stones. The stones have been around since 2000 B.C. There are 13 primary stones in the collection and the circle of monuments represent a somewhat distorted Celtic cross. The largest stone marks an entrance to a burial site where human remains have been found. In addition to the stones, there are stunning beaches on the isle, like Valtos Beach and Tolsta Beach. If you plan your trip for summer, you'll make the Hebridean Celtic Festival, which is one of the largest Celtic festivals in the world.

Watch: What to do in Scotland

Check out this exclusive video of Claire's recent trip to Scotland with Disney/Pixar for the DVD/Blu-ray release of the movie Brave. Watch her practice archery, falconry and more!

More European travel hot spots

What to do and see in Prague
What to see and do in Budapest
Best places to travel alone

2 of 2
Recommended for You
Comments
Hot
New in Living
Close

And you'll see personalized content just for you whenever you click the My Feed .

SheKnows is making some changes!