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31 Words to sophisticate your dialect

Heather Barnett is a freelance writer and foodie whose work has been featured in blogs, websites, magazines, and TV and radio ads. She spends her free time relaxing with her soulmate, Keith; her dog, Mosby "The Fly Slayer;" and Felix th...

A word a day for the glottologist

Don't let Russell Brand have all the fun! Sprinkle these 31 words into your conversations to help you sound smarter and more sophisticated than ever.
A word a day for the glottologist

A word
a day for the glottologist

Don't let Russell Brand have all the fun! Sprinkle these 31 words into your conversations to help you sound smarter and more sophisticated than ever.

A word a day for the glottologist

Do you want to sound smarter? We're bringing you one word a day for the month of March. The challenge? Use the word of the day in a sentence at least once each day.

Mar. 1

Glottologist

noun

[glo-TOL-uh-jist]

A person who studies language

A true glottologist, Amy was the queen of Scrabble.

Origin: Derived from the Greek glôtta (tongue)

Mar. 2

Cachinnate

verb

[KAK-uh-neyt]

To laugh really loudly; ROTFLMAO

I'm a great cook, but my boyfriend would cachinnate at the thought of my doing the dishes.

Origin: From the Latin cachinnatus (to laugh aloud)

Mar. 3

Glib

adjective

[glib]

Easy in actions or manners, typically in a thoughtless or superficial way

When asked about his history of drug use, Bill Clinton glibly noted that he'd never inhaled.

Origin: Probably a modification of the Low German glibberig (slippery)

Mar. 4

Abomination

noun

[uh-bom-uh-NEY-shuhn]

Something loathed, disliked or abhorred

Joan Rivers put the actress on her worst-dressed list — which isn't surprising. That dress was an abomination!

Origin: From the Latin abominatus (loathed)

Mar. 5

Fidus achates

noun

[FEED-us uh-KAH-tays]

A true friend; BFF

Tracy decided to unfollow everyone on Twitter who wasn't a fidus achates.

Origin: Latin description of the character from Virgil's Aeneid who was the faithful companion of Aeneas

Mar. 6

Sycophant

noun

[SIK-uh-fuhnt, SAHYK-uh-fuhnt]

An individual who flatters another (usually a superior) with the intention of elevating his or her place in the hierarchy or attaining a personal goal; a self-serving parasite

In the Disney version of Robin Hood, the sycophant snake Sir Hiss helps Prince John try to catch Robin Hood.

Origin: From the Greek sykophantes (slanderer)

Mar. 7

Ostentatious

adjective

[os-ten-TEY-shuhs]

Showy or pretentious

RuPaul is well known for her ostentatious outfits.

Origin: From the late Middle English ostentation (to display or exhibit)

Mar. 8

Panacea

noun

[pan-uh-SEE-uh]

A cure-all or universal remedy; a magic potion

Elizabeth's mother seems to believe chicken soup is a panacea.

Origin: From the Greek panakeia (all-healing)

Mar. 9

Ergo

conjunction, adverb

[UR-goh, ER-goh]

Therefore

Kelly dislikes onions; ergo, she will not eat pico de gallo.

Origin: Latin

Mar. 10

Uxorious

adjective

[uhk-SAWR-ee-uhs]

Overly doting or submissive toward one's wife

Margot loves that her husband is so attentive, but others simply find him uxorious.

Origin: From the Latin uxor (wife)

Mar. 11

Adroit

adjective

[ah-DROYT]

Skilled or clever (in a specific skill)

Georgia is an adroit typist, clocking in at an average of 96 words per minute.

Origin: From the Old French a- + droit (straight, just, correct)

Mar. 12

Reciprocity

noun

[res-uh-PROS-i-tee]

Mutual exchange; tit for tat

In the spirit of reciprocity, Kayla bought Steven lunch for his help on her project.

Origin: From the Latin reciproc

Mar. 13

Chatoyant

adjective

[shuh-TOI-uhnt]

An object or material that changes in color or luster

Nancy's eyes were positively chatoyant, appearing either green or blue, depending on the color of her clothes.

Origin: From the French chatoyer (to change in color, as a cat's eye)

Mar. 14

Dalliance

noun

[DAL-ee-uhns, DAL-yuhns]

A brief love affair or flirtation; time spent frivolously

Before proposing to Behati Prinsloo, Adam Levine had a dalliance with model Nina Agdal.

Origin: From the Middle English daliaunce

Up next: More words to sophisticate your dialect >>

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