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Reviving Houseplants

Melissa is the assignment editor and contributing writer for SheKnows Home and Living. While other little girls were playing dress up with Barbie, Melissa was busy remodeling Barbie's house. She now lives out her dream covering design an...

Think that houseplant's a goner? You may be able to bring it back.

Keeping houseplants can add life to your home and help cleanse the air. But, if your thumb isn't as green as it could be, houseplants may not enjoy the good life in your home. If you have some indoor plants that look like they should be pushing up daisies, don't toss them out yet. Some common houseplant problems are easy to fix.


Keeping houseplants can add life to your home and help cleanse the air. But, if your thumb isn't as green as it could be, houseplants may not enjoy the good life in your home. If you have some indoor plants that look like they should be pushing up daisies, don't toss them out yet. Some common houseplant problems are easy to fix.

The main reason houseplants go south is due to underwatering, and your plant will show you signs of that by drooping or yellowing leaves. Clip away any brown or yellow leaves, then give your plant a drink. It should come back within a few hours. Too much water can be an issue also. Water houseplants only when the soil feels slightly dry to the touch, generally every few days.

Insufficient light can cause problems for indoor plants. Make sure you're providing enough light for the plant species. Most houseplants come with a tag that describes their required hours of light exposure. Try moving the plant to a brighter area of the home and see if it does better. Grow lights can be helpful for dark corners. The same holds true for too much light. Move a stressed houseplant to a shadier spot to give it a break from the heat.

If you're doing everything right with light and water, houseplants can still show signs of duress, and the best way to combat it is by repotting them. Maybe the soil is leeched, or the roots are growing too big for the current planter. Gently remove the plant from its planter and replace it in a larger planter with fresh potting soil.
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