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Organic Produce Myths

Melissa is the assignment editor and contributing writer for SheKnows Home and Living. While other little girls were playing dress up with Barbie, Melissa was busy remodeling Barbie's house. She now lives out her dream covering design an...

Debunking some of the common misconceptions about organically grown foods.

Many people are choosing to go organic in the grocery store and in their own gardens. While organic foods have their benefits, the general public has a tendency to believe some of the myths associated with organic foods, and they're not all true.


Many people are choosing to go organic in the grocery store and in their own gardens. While organic foods have their benefits, the general public has a tendency to believe some of the myths associated with organic foods, and they're not all true.

Myth #1: Organic vegetables taste better.

If you're buying organic veggies from the grocery store, you probably won't be able to tell any difference between the organic and non-organic flavors. If you're growing in a home garden, both organic and non-organic will taste better than what you buy in the store simply because they're fresher. Taste is subjective, but generally anything local will taste better, regardless of how it's grown.

Myth #2: You don't have to wash organic produce.

Not true. Just because there are no inorganic chemicals to wash away doesn't mean they are clean. Organic farming still uses chemicals; although they are natural chemicals, you still don't want to eat them. In addition, all produce has some level of animal or human contamination that you need to rinse off. The only real exceptions are produce that has a thick peel that you remove before eating (like garlic, onions, avocados, melons, etc.), and for that matter you don't need to wash the non-organic versions of these fruits and veggies.

Myth #3: Organic vegetables are more nutritious.

When it comes to the vitamins and minerals contained in an apple, carrot or any other fruit or veggie, there's no difference between the organic and non-organic produce. The time from harvest to consumption is the big factor in what makes one vegetable more nutrient-rich than another, since the nutrient content of all produce depletes as it sits on the shelf. Locally-grown organic foods may be healthier, just because of their freshness.

Myth #4: Buying organic supports local farmers.

Not always. If you're buying organic from a grocery store chain, the stocked organic produce was probably farmed by a large commercial organic farm, owned by one of the big names in food, like Kraft or General Mills. Unless you're buying direct from a farmer at your local farmer's market, you're not helping the little guys.

Remember also that just because something is labeled "organic" does not mean that it's grown or produced with 100 percent organic practices. The USDA regulates that 95 percent organic practices are necessary for the organic label. Although all the myths about organic foods aren't true, when you choose to support the true local organic farmers, you can rest assured that you are buying fresh, quality produce that was created with the environment in mind.




 

 

 
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