Dividing Perennials

Divide Perennial Flower Roots To Propagate Plants.

Dividing perennial plants is a reliable way to propagate plants that form root and stem clumps. During the dividing process, you separate these clumps into individual plants. Dividing perennials promotes healthy growth and renewed flowering.


Dividing perennial plants is a reliable way to propagate plants that form root and stem clumps. During the dividing process, you separate these clumps into individual plants. Dividing perennials promotes healthy growth and renewed flowering.

Perennial flowers that benefit from division include:

  • Aster

  • Chrysanthemum

  • Delphinium

  • Daisy

  • Foxglove

  • Iris

  • Phlox


In general, perennial plants benefit from division about every three years. Early spring, before plants start to really grow, is a good time to start dividing. Divide perennials on an overcast day, so sun will not damage the roots when they are exposed. You'll also want a hose handy so you can keep divided plants from drying out before they are replanted.

The first step is to dig up a plant. Gently use a digging fork to break the soil around the plant and remove the root clump from the soil. Use a hose to wash away dirt from the root so you can see what you're working with. Use the crown of the plant as a guide to where natural divisions would occur. Carefully cut the root along those guides, leaving three to five buds growing from each division.

Replant your divided perennial flowers in the same location or relocate them to containers or other flower beds.

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