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Conserving Water in the Garden

Melissa is the assignment editor and contributing writer for SheKnows Home and Living. While other little girls were playing dress up with Barbie, Melissa was busy remodeling Barbie's house. She now lives out her dream covering design an...

Effective use of water in the garden can help reduce your carbon footprint.

If you live in a dry area or want to do your part to reduce your carbon footprint, a good place to start is with the water in your garden. Conserving water can have an important impact on the Earth, and can make you a more efficient gardener.


If you live in a dry area or want to do your part to reduce your carbon footprint, a good place to start is with the water in your garden. Conserving water can have an important impact on the Earth, and can make you a more efficient gardener.If you have sandy soil, a hillside garden or live in a desert climate, you've probably noticed the impact watering your garden can have on your water bill--especially as temperatures get warmer.

Here are some ideas for conserving water in your garden:

  • Choose drought-tolerant plants. They can be watered less frequently and require less water in general.

  • Don't water between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. The daytime sun evaporates a lot of water.

  • Water deeply and infrequently. Not only will the soil retain more water, but plants will develop deeper roots.

  • Use hose sprayers or drip irrigation to be sure water goes where it needs to. Water sprayed into the air by sprinklers partially evaporates in the air, and the overhead sprinkling can waste water by spraying on patios or driveways.

  • Mulch bare soil to prevent evaporation and help the soil maintain moisture. Organic mulches (leaves, straw, wood chips) tend to add nutrients to the soil while non-organic choices (gravel, stone chips) only retain moisture

  • Install a barrel to collect rainwater from the roof.Most rainwater collection receptacles have a tap so you can pour water directly into your watering can.

  • Recycle grey water from the home for watering non-edible garden plants. Grey water includes bathwater and dishwater. Both are safe for garden use as long as harsh detergents or chemicals were not used.


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