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Garden Fence Ideas

Melissa is the assignment editor and contributing writer for SheKnows Home and Living. While other little girls were playing dress up with Barbie, Melissa was busy remodeling Barbie's house. She now lives out her dream covering design an...

A garden fence can get the job done without being obtrusive or expensive.

Although the goal may be to integrate the garden as part of your lawn and home, four-legged friends may pose a challenge to that idealistic garden proposal. Fortunately there are options for fencing your garden that won't turn it into a visual fortress.


Although the goal may be to integrate the garden as part of your lawn and home, four-legged friends may pose a challenge to that idealistic garden proposal. Fortunately there are options for fencing your garden that won't turn it into a visual fortress.

My dog loves to dig, but for some reason she doesn't dig anywhere in the yard but in my garden after it's just planted. She doesn't bother messing with it once plants grow. Maybe she's jealous of the attention the dirt receives??? As much as I don't want to fence it off, I'm going to have to make my garden off limits for a few weeks after tilling just to keep her out!

Garden fence options to try:

  • Shrubs: If your garden does well enough in shade, a shrub border can provide privacy and protection while maintaining a natural look.

  • Rocks: Rocks are another natural choice. Stack up large ones to create a wall. you can use mortar to hold them in place if you want, or stack them without adhesive for a wall you can eventually remove.

  • Wood picket fence: A picket fence doesn't need to be white. Paint it with a natural stain or a color that complements your house or garden.

  • Container plants: A border made from a line of potted plants can bridge the gap between garden and fence.

  • Bottles: Stacked wine, beer or soda bottles can make a unique fence with a stained glass effect that adds and eccentric touch to the garden.

  • Chain link: A permanent chain-link fence doesn't need to look like a chicken coop. Use the links as a trellis for melons, squash and cucumbers or grow grapevines on the fence to cover up the metal.


Since my garden fence is temporary, I'm planning to use green wire fencing decorated with some vines to keep it from looking completely awful. Once I no longer need it, I plan to roll it up and save for next season!
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