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Growing Rosemary

Melissa Dunlap is a writer, editor and blogger specializing in lifestyle communications. Fueled by curiosity, and a tad too much coffee, Melissa enjoys dissecting current trends for the modern woman. When she's not having dance parties w...

Rosemary is a fragrant and flavorful addition to any cook's herb garden.

Rosemary makes an attractive and fragrant addition to herb gardens. Since it pairs so well with many meats and fish, you may also find that it's the most used member of your herb garden.


Rosemary makes an attractive and fragrant addition to herb gardens. Since it pairs so well with many meats and fish, you may also find that it's the most used member of your herb garden. Growing rosemary is fairly simple for any location.

Rosemary may be grown from seed, from transplant or from cuttings. The seeds do have a lower-than-average germination rate, so this can be frustrating. Try taking an 8-cm cutting from an existing plant and place it in a pot of moist compost. The cutting will develop roots and be ready to transplant in about 2 months.

Rosemary enjoys full sunlight, but can tolerate some shade. It does best in rich, well-drained soil and grows well in gardens or in containers. As a perennial, it will grow year-round. Rosemary prefers heat, but it is somewhat frost hardy; as long as it is protected, it will survive light frosts. If left alone, rosemary can grow into a huge shrub. Keep it pruned if you do not have space for it to take over.

Use fresh rosemary in a variety of dishes, including poultry, pork, fish and soups. To release even more rosemary flavor, crush leaves and stems before adding to recipes.
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