Designed By Television

It’s been a year since a new episode of Mad Men has aired on AMC -- and with the season five premiere scheduled for 2012, many fans of the series are going through withdrawal. Celebrate the upcoming season by incorporating elements from the 1960s-set television series into your interior design.

1Madly modern

Also known as mid-century modern, the 1960s-inspired sets of Mad Men feature furniture with sleek lines and geometric shapes -- but don't go completely boxy with your design. Designers of the era relied heavily on angles to achieve a modern look, but they often softened the sharpness by incorporating curves.

1960s designers Eero Saarinen and Arne Jacobsen did so by taking inspiration from organic shapes like the tulip and the egg. But furniture from the era wasn't completely devoid of ornamentation -- many pieces had symmetrical tufted buttons or graphic woodwork incorporated into their designs.

Simplicity and symmetry are key when incorporating the early '60s into your living space. And remember the minimalist mindset -- less is more.

Madly modern

Peter Campbell's geometric lamp (left)
Roger's modern office
(right)


2Brazen color palettes

Most modern color palettes were much more vibrant than the monochromatic black and white in Roger Sterling's office. From the primary-colored front lobby furniture in the new offices of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce to the many burnt-orange sofas featured in the series, the Mad Men sets show off how fearless designers in the '60s were with their use of bright colors.

Vibrant hues were no longer reserved for floral arrangements or small accessories -- the '60s were all about incorporating bright colors in a bold way. Harness the vibrant hues of the era by painting one wall as a focal point or by upholstering large furniture items in a brilliant blue or fiery red.

Brazen color palettes

Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce front lobby (left)
Betty's orange sofa (right)


3Frisky patterns and enticing textiles

Designers in the 1960s weren't just brazen with their color choices -- they went mad with pattern as well. The graphic print on Betty Draper's living room chairs is a classic example of a mid-century modern textile, with its sharp contrasts and repeated patterns. However, the '60s didn't abandon Mother Nature completely.

While black lacquer, white leather and polished chrome were the standout textiles of the era, exposed wood grain was also heavily used. Many designers softened modern lines with natural wood textures, as evident in Don Draper's office furniture. Mother Nature also showed up in prints like the star and flower patterns popular in the day -- but the nature-based patterns were given the modern '60s twist.

Add the outdoors to your '60s-style interior by incorporating wood accent tables with simple, modern lines and accent pillows with geometric prints.

Frisky patterns & enticing textiles

Don's office wood furnishings (left)
Geometric leaf-print waste basket (right)
Betty Draper's mod-patterned chairs (bottom)


4Vintage holdovers

Most people collect their belongings over an extended period of time, leading to interior design that features pieces from multiple decades. To prevent the sets from looking too stylized and fake, Mad Men's decorators incorporated items from the 1940s and '50s into their sets as well.

Keep your interior from looking over-styled by picking up a few vintage items to incorporate into your Mad Men-inspired interior. Search flea markets and antique stores for pieces like a 1950s console television with a wood casing that can serve as an end table and a conversation piece.

Vintage holdovers

Betty's vintage romance bedroom (left)
Peggy's '50s-style fridge, hairpin leg coffee table and vintage television (right)


More interior design tips

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3 Neutral color palettes to complement any decor
Personality-based dorm room décor
Photo gallery:
Modern apartments

Photo: AMCTV.com

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Comments

Comments on "Interior design ideas inspired by AMC’s Mad Men"

Laura January 11, 2012 | 1:17 AM

I really like your fourth and final point, and it's probably the most important idea of all. Although I love mid-century design myself, I also like modern from the 60s and even a few kitschy, nostaglic items from the 70s. It's all derived from previous decades and designers, and we live in the present day so can't really be religiously true to those eras anyway! I think Matthew Weiner once said himself about the show's style, whether it's the colors, clothes, furniture, cars or cultural references, that if they were all "up the moment", the show wouldn't ring true because people then as now don't update all the time. We keep those things we like and incorporate them into the new sometimes for years to come.

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