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What's yarn bombing, you ask? It's the coolest way to jazz up your houseplants

Debbie Wolfe is a mom of two rambunctious boys, wife, and work-at-home mom from Georgia. In her free time (when there is such a thing), she is in the garden or hidden away reading the latest post-apocalyptic sci-fi drama! As interests,...

Yarn bombing is the craft that's dangerously addictive

Yarn bombing, also known as guerrilla knitting, has knitters and crocheters united in one cause: to adorn the world in yarn. What is this crazy form of artistic expression? Well, it’s not your grandma holding a highly explosive ball of yarn.

Yarn bombing began at the beginning of the 21st century either in the U.S. or Northern Europe as a form of non-offensive graffiti. What began as little knitted or crocheted cozies over door handles evolved into intricate yarn masterpieces covering walls, trees, statues, lamp posts, bike ramps, benches and more.

Nothing is safe from a yarn bombing, and there’s nothing about this craft that’s boring or old-fashioned. Check out some examples of yarn bombs.

How to yarn bomb a houseplant

For your first yarn bomb, there is no need to be extravagant. Start off small with a houseplant. To demo a simple yarn-wrapping technique, I will yarn bomb my cane tree.

Here's what you'll need:

Yarn bombing is the craft that's dangerously addictive

  • Yarn
  • Hot glue
  • Houseplant

Don't worry, the hot glue will not damage the tree. Only a little bit will be used to secure the beginning and end tails of the yarn. Use a plant that has a stem free of leaves. This will make it easier to wrap the yarn. Some houseplant varieties to consider are lucky bamboo, ficus or cane (pictured above).

Step 1

Put a dab of glue at the base of the plant where you want to start the yarn wrap. Place the beginning yarn tail on the dab of glue and begin wrapping.

Yarn bombing is the craft that's dangerously addictive

Step 2

Continue wrapping up the trunk. Pull to keep the yarn snug around the trunk but not too firm. The idea is to keep the wrap from slipping but not so tight that it cuts into the trunk. For this cane plant, the yarn did not slip too bad due to the rough texture of the trunk. If you are using lucky bamboo or a plant with a smooth-surface trunk, you might need to secure the yarn with more glue in several places. Just a dab here and there. No need to over glue.

Step 3

Add different colors and textures of yarn. Create stripes or a block pattern... use your imagination. Secure the end tail of yarn with another dab of glue.

Yarn bombing is the craft that's dangerously addictive

Now you have your own piece of yarn-bombed art in your home. What's next? I think the maple tree in the front yard is going to be getting a yarn makeover really soon.

More in yarn crafts

DIY yarn wreath with attachments
Yarn art project for kids
DIY yarn Easter eggs

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