Share this Story

Why Do We Get That Lump in Our Throat When We're Sad?

Katie Smith had three kids in three years and crafts her ass off in order to stay sane. She loves to write, wear faux leather pants, eat at burger joints, and make beautiful things. She is a staff writer for Scary Mommy and a regular con...

The truth behind the 'lump' you get in your throat when you're emotional

My family is a big fan of the show America's Got Talent, especially my 10-year-old son. The other evening as we were catching up on episodes, during a very emotional singing performance by one of the contestants, he turned to me and said, "Mom, why do we get a lump in our throat when we feel like we want to cry?"

His question made me get a lump in my throat, of course, but it did make me wonder. What is this thing we always feel bubble up in our throat? Do we get it because we are trying to fight against our emotions?

I've not only felt it when I am about to cry, but I've been known to try and swallow down that annoying lump when I'm nervous or anxious. It is especially hard to deal with when speaking in front of crowds. It just seems to stick there and can make speaking very difficult — you can't cough it up or clear your throat, and it makes swallowing extremely hard.

More: These Are America's Weirdest Injuries

Dr. Jennifer Stagg, a biochemist-turned-naturopathic physician who authored the book Unzip Your Genes: 5 Choices to Reveal a Radically Radiant You, says it isn't a lump at all. "In medical terminology, it is referred to as ‘globus sensation.'" So really, we just have a feeling there is something (it usually feels like phlegm) lodged in our gullet, but there is nothing there at all.

The fact that it makes swallowing more difficult is not in our heads, though. Stagg adds if you do have that feeling in your throat, you are better off trying to have a few sips of water or trying to eat something, since it's easier to swallow with something going down our esophagus than it is to dry swallow.

The causes for this globus sensation don't just sneak up on us during emotionally stressful times. According to Stagg, in some of these cases, the condition may be linked to inflammation, reflux and problems with the esophagus, epiglottis or thyroid. So be aware if this is happening to you on the regular and you don't think your emotions are a contributing factor, it's best to consult a doctor to get to the bottom of what may be a bigger problem.

Unfortunately, Stagg says there really is no treatment for the emotional throat lump. It's part of being an emotional being.

MoreYou Should Be Pooping in This Position

She did mention that people who suffer from anxiety and stressful events in their life "are more likely to be affected by chronic globus sensation, and there is no known way to prevent it."

Stagg adds that some ENTs (ears, nose and throat doctors) believe the sense of a lump in the throat "is the result of an altered sensory pathway (similar to ringing in the ears), which would make more sense, knowing the link to emotional status and mood disorders."

It looks like it may be something we are stuck with (no pun intended), but keeping water or food nearby when we feel it coming on is a small thing we can do the ease the sensation, because unfortunately, we can't avoid stressful or emotionally charged situations all the time. But at least now you know it's not just your imagination.

Comments
Follow Us

SheKnows Media ‐ Beauty and Style

Hot
New in Health & Wellness
Close

And you'll see personalized content just for you whenever you click the My Feed .

SheKnows is making some changes!

b h e a r d !

Welcome to the new SheKnows Community,

where you can share your stories, ideas

and CONNECT with millions of women.

Get Started