Start writing
Share this Story

Reversible Male Contraceptive Gel Looks Promising

Dr. Elizabeth Yuko is the Health Editor at SheKnows. She is a bioethicist and writer specializing in sexual and reproductive health and the intersection of bioethics and popular culture. She is an adjunct professor of ethics at Fordham ...

Vasalgel was 100 percent effective in preventing pregnancies during the monkey trial

We’re one step closer on the never-ending quest to find safe, effective male birth control thanks to the promising results of a study on a male contraceptive gel. Known on the market as Vasalgel, the gel presents a reversible and less invasive option for men who want to take responsibility for preventing unplanned pregnancies without having a vasectomy.

Vasalgel works by acting as a physical barrier that is injected into the tubes to block sperm from swimming down into the penis. Basically, it’s like a gel version of a vasectomy: Sperm will continue to be produced in the testes, but then dissolves or is absorbed into the body instead of being ejaculated.

The contraceptive gel was 100 percent effective in preventing pregnancy during the two-year trial with monkeys. The company behind Vasalgel hopes to begin clinical trials with human men in the next few years.

"Given that condoms only work with perfect use and vasectomies are permanent, Vasalgel is an exciting potential therapy for men who want a reversible form of contraception," Dr. Brian Levine, a reproductive endocrinology and infertility specialist and the practice director of CCRM New York told SheKnows.

More: We're One Step Closer to Getting Birth Control Pills Without a Prescription

In order for Vasalgel to hit the market, it first has to secure funding for the human clinical trial, during which it needs to be proven safe and effective. Given the widespread uproar over side effects in a recent trial for a male contraceptive hormone injection, this will be easier said than done.

More: Why 2017 Could Be the Year of Male Birth Control

Makers of Vasalgel are hoping that it will appeal to men because it is reversible and isn’t something they would have to worry about on a day-to-day basis.

“This would be more akin to an IUD [the coil] in women,” Catherine VandeVoort of the California National Primate Research Centre and the study’s lead author told The Guardian.

More: This Just In: Male Birth Control May Be in Our Future

Comments
Follow Us

SheKnows Media ‐ Beauty and Style

Hot
New in Health & Wellness
Close

And you'll see personalized content just for you whenever you click the My Feed .

SheKnows is making some changes!

b h e a r d !

Welcome to the new SheKnows Community,

where you can share your stories, ideas

and CONNECT with millions of women.

Get Started