Start writing
Share this Story

The Very Real Things Bipolar Disorder Has Cost Me

I have two blogs. One, Et Cetera, etc. (janetcobur.wordpress,com), is a general-purpose blog with content about cats, books, rants, education, language, and various other of my interests. The other, Bipolar Me (bipolarjan.wordpress.com),...

Bipolar disorder has made me lose big parts of my life

Last month I wrote about how bipolar disorder had cost me – well, not the ability – but the capacity to read. I am intensely thankful that the concentration, focus, and motivation to read have returned as my healing has progressed.

But there are some other things that are missing from my life that I wish desperately that I could get back. Or wish I had never lost in the first place. (Depression is very much with me right now, so forgive me if I dwell in the past with my failures a bit.)

First are friends. I've written about this before too, but the subject was brought home to me recently when I received a fuck-off letter from a former friend I was trying to reach out to, in hopes of reestablishing the relationship. One of her main reasons for cutting me off was that every time we went out, she felt it was "her and me and my misery."

More: 5 things therapy has done for me

She did acknowledge that at times our friendship had been burdened by her misery too, but evidently that either didn't count as much, or else mine lasted too long. (If it was too long for her, it was even longer for me.) I am very disappointed that, now that my "black dog" is smaller and on a leash, she found other reasons not to associate with me. To make it more ironic, she has been a therapist and now teaches psychology.

I also miss having a steady paycheck. My last 9-5 office job was over ten years ago, and since then my mental state has not allowed me to get and keep another such position. The security of knowing how much money I would have every month allowed me to plan.

And to travel. I really miss traveling. Admittedly, part of my inability to travel now is determined by my physical health. But my anxiety would make it just that much more difficult. Now I can barely get away for a weekend, and even then I must carefully monitor my moods, limit my activities, track my eating and sleeping, and avoid crowds.

More: I thought my hypomania was just relief from my depression

One of my deepest regrets is that when I was undiagnosed and untreated, I couldn't fulfill my potential. I attended an Ivy League university, but I can't say I got out of it what I could or should have. I feel now that I skated by, impeded by many depressive spells, lack of focus and concentration, and confusion. I even took a year off to get my head together, but since that didn't include getting help for my bipolar disorder, its value was questionable.

Lest this seem like nothing but whining (which my depression is telling is what it is), there are also some things that bipolar disorder has taken from me that I don't miss at all.

Oddly, one of them is a 9-5 office job. While I do miss the steady paycheck, I absolutely don't miss the things that came with it. Now, doing freelance work, I can fit my work around the things I need to do (like seeing my therapist) and the things I have to do (like slowing down when depression hits). I don't have to get up at the same time every day and dress appropriately (if at all) and try to fit in and socialize with my co-workers. That was never easy for me and became nearly impossible after my big meltdown.

And, as much as I miss travel, I don't miss business travel. Again, being "on" all the time, for days at a time, with no time or place to decompress, would be impossible now. Since we usually had to share hotel rooms, there wasn't even a chance for any alone time, which I need a fair amount of. I could never get the hang of "team eating" either.

More: Just because I'm agoraphobic doesn't mean that I'm introverted

Finally, I don't miss the boyfriend who took an already broken me and broke me worse. (I wrote about him in my post about gaslighting.) My self-esteem was not great before the relationship, but afterward it went into negative numbers. Self-harm, self-medication, self-doubt, and negative self-talk were what I had instead. But Rex didn't do it alone. He had my bipolar disorder there to reinforce his words and actions. And to not let me see what was happening.

Bipolar disorder is a balancing act, in more ways than one. It takes away good things from our lives. But my therapist reminds me that it also gives an opportunity – as I rebuild my life, I can choose which pieces I want to reclaim and which I want to discard. And the parts I can rebuild are what I should concentrate on.

And I will, once this spell of depression releases me.

Comments
Follow Us

SheKnows Media ‐ Beauty and Style

Hot
New in Health & Wellness
Close

And you'll see personalized content just for you whenever you click the My Feed .

SheKnows is making some changes!

b h e a r d !

Welcome to the new SheKnows Community,

where you can share your stories, ideas

and CONNECT with millions of women.

Get Started