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5 things therapy has done for me

I have two blogs. One, Et Cetera, etc. (janetcobur.wordpress,com), is a general-purpose blog with content about cats, books, rants, education, language, and various other of my interests. The other, Bipolar Me (bipolarjan.wordpress.com),...

Exactly how talk therapy has helped my mental health

Why pay $250 an hour just to talk to someone? That was my sister's reaction when I said I was going to start seeing a therapist. Here's what I think.

While a psychiatrist doesn't cost 5 cents anymore, therapy can be had for a lot less than $250. There are community mental health centers with sliding fee scales which is what I was going to then. There is insurance, for now at least. I've even known psychotherapists who would accept less than their usual fee for long-time patients in temporarily dire straits.

More: I thought my hypomania was just relief from my depression

And I'm not paying to talk to just "someone." A therapist usually has at least an M.A., and sometimes a Ph.D. Psychiatrists have an M.D. or D.O. They have years of training, more years of experience and colleagues they can consult if your problem is particularly challenging or out of their area of expertise. You can also find peer counselors, religious counselors, and proponents of every variety of therapy or treatment you can name, from neuro-linguistic programming to electroconvulsive therapy.

Now, as I reflect on my clueless sister, I've started thinking about all the things that therapy has done for me.

1. Given me a diagnosis. When I first started going, back in the 80s, I could only afford one of those community mental health centers with the sliding fee scale. (At the time, I paid $5 per session.) There I was diagnosed with depression. The primary treatment they offered was "talk therapy," but I had years and years of mental difficulties to talk about. Later, when I was seeing a psychiatrist, I was re-diagnosed with bipolar 2 and anxiety disorder. Suddenly, my past became a lot clearer, even if my present was still messed up.

More: Just because I'm agoraphobic doesn't mean that I'm introverted

2. Provided me with medication. There has been a lot of it over the years. I started, as so many did, with Prozac, which had a noticeable effect on my depression. It was like the difference between watching a black-and-white TV that got only one channel that showed only tampon commercials, compared to a wide-screen color TV that got hundreds of cable channels. The meds I'm on right now keep me functional, at least enough to make a living and be creative.

3. Offered me perspective. When I first started going to my current therapist, the word I used most often to describe myself was "pathetic." I no longer call myself that. Dr. B. helped me view parts of my past in a different light and helped me develop techniques and strategies to deal with the problems I was facing at the time. Now she keeps me on track, reminding me that I have the tools to cope with many of my recurring problems. And she reminds me how far I've come since my "pathetic" days.

4. Helped my relationships. When we married, I was still smack in the middle of clinical depression. (My husband had problems too, but I don't want to talk about them here, except to say that a codependent and a depressive living together can never decide where to go for lunch. And that was the least of our difficulties.) Several times since then, we have had to turn to counselors to work on problems related to sex, money, and just plain living and communicating together.

More: My partner used my undiagnosed bipolar disorder to gaslight me

5. Gave me alternatives. Actually, though I've attended group therapy a few times, what I've learned from it is that it's not for me. I do appreciate the fact that it's there if I should need or want it, and that my therapist can recommend a group if she or he is going to be away for a while. Perhaps I just haven't found the right group yet, although the support communities I've found online may serve part of the same purpose.

In short, therapy has given me my life, my sanity, my coping skills, my emotional strength and my creativity back. And I can definitely say that professional therapy has been more than worth the money.

Originally posted on BipolarJan.

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