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Your plate size vs. your waist size

How a smaller plate could mean a smaller you!

From SheKnows Canada
Could how you eat actually matter as much as what you eat? This week I experimented with portion control without any measuring or weighing, but by simply switching the plates I use. Are smaller plates the solution instead of calorie counting, and could they mean a slimmer you? Take a look at my tips!

No more weighting

a smaller plate could mean a smaller you

Could how you eat actually matter as much as what you eat? This week I experimented with portion control without any measuring or weighing, but by simply switching the plates I use. Are smaller plates the solution instead of calorie counting, and could they mean a slimmer you? Take a look at my tips.

Alex Bogusky and Chuck Porter's book The 9-Inch Diet looks at portion-control tricks and tips using 9-inch plates instead of focusing on what you put on your plate. I've been hearing and reading articles on the "small plate revolution" and decided to give it a try. Here's what I found:

The glass is half full

I don't say this to get all preachy on you, but think about the glass being half empty. What if you took the water or juice in this glass and poured it into a smaller glass? Wouldn't the glass be full? I've read up on portion control using utensils and plates as measures, and it might actually work. If you have a giant plate and fill it with half a cup of pasta, it will look empty, and you're more likely to add a few more spoonfuls of pasta to fill all that white space. Imagine replacing this huge plate with one half its size. Now that half a cup of pasta actually looks visually filling, since it fills the plate up, and you see less white.

Fill big plates with veggies

broccoli

If you really don't want to say goodbye to the large plates that you're used to eating off, then you can still use them — but wisely. Fill up on leafy greens and vegetables if the smaller plate isn't doing it for you. Or use the smaller plate for your protein and carbohydrates, and if you're still hungry, use the larger plate for some salad.

Still be mindful of what you eat

While Bogusky and Porter don't focus on what you eat but rather how much you eat, I still make sure I'm eating healthily. So even if you find yourself getting better with portion control by using smaller plates, don't let that ruin your healthy eating habits. Keep the whole grains, vegetables and lean proteins around, and avoid the starches, processed foods and added sugars.

Don't choose too small a plate

When I first started experimenting with this, I found myself itching to go for seconds because my plate was so small and I was still hungry. Don't choose a tiny plate that can fit only two Oreos. Make sure your plate is reasonable but not too large. Bogusky and Porter recommend the 9-inch plate. I don't really measure, but I tend to choose plates that are about the same size as my hand when stretched out. These plates do it for me so that I don't have to go for seconds.

Be careful when it comes to secondswoman eating at cafe

Eating off a smaller plate doesn't give you the pass to eat more helpings. If you must go for seconds, don't fill the entire plate but half, and then see how you feel after 20 minutes or so. This will help you avoid overeating. It's all about balance.

More on weight loss

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Do old photos help motivate weight loss
How to eat out and still lose weight

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