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5 Super sources of protein for vegans

Non-vegans often claim the vegan diet is short on protein, but that is because they haven't thought outside the meat and dairy box. The vegan diet has plenty of protein to satisfy your daily requirements. Here are five super sources of protein for vegans.

Vegan naysayers will warn you that your vegan diet is short on protein, but that is because they haven't thought outside the meat and dairy box. The vegan diet has plenty of protein to satisfy your daily requirements, whether you're an athlete or an occasional exerciser. Here are five super sources of protein for vegans.
Vegan naysayers will warn you that your vegan diet is short on protein, but that is because they haven't thought outside the meat and dairy box. The vegan diet has plenty of protein to satisfy your daily requirements, whether you're an athlete or an occasional exerciser. Here are five super sources of protein for vegans.

1. Tempeh

Tempeh is a fermented soy food that has a meaty texture, much like burger, and nutty flavor. Best yet, it boasts 18 grams of protein per serving (depending on the brand) and, unlike animal-derived protein, it is cholesterol-free. Tempeh can be used as taco or burrito fillings, added to stir-fry, or tossed onto a pizza. Another soy source of protein is edamame (fresh soybeans), which delivers 22 grams of protein per cup.

2. Beans

All beans are a tasty -- and versatile -- source of protein, that can be pureed into dips or used as the base of a soup, tossed into rice, pasta, or salads, or simmered in a veggie stew or chili. Fava beans ring in at 22 grams of protein per serving while lentils have around 17 grams per cup.

3. Nuts

Nuts are a crunchy good source of protein, ranging from 2 to 7 grams of protein per ounce. Almonds and peanuts have the highest amounts of protein while macadamia nuts and pecans have the least. Toss a handful of nuts into your breakfast cereal, salads, and rice dishes to give your meals a protein boost. You can also slather nut butters onto toast, sandwiches, or wraps, as well as stir them into nutty sauces for pasta or veggies.

4. Quinoa

Quinoa is an ancient super grain that is rich in protein and other vitamins and minerals, particularly potassium, manganese, and magnesium. Cooked quinoa has 9 grams of protein per cup, and can be eaten for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Try it in place of oatmeal with a splash of soy milk, toss it with dried fruit and nuts for a salad, or use it to stuff acorn squash halves or other veggies for a delicious dinner.

5. Oats

Old fashioned oats are not only a great source of fiber (4 grams per serving), they deliver 5 grams of protein per one-half cup, uncooked. Popular as a breakfast food, oats can also be added whole -- or ground into flour -- for baked goods.

More vegan lifestyle tips!
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