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Irish soda bread 4 ways

Brandy is the author of the food blog, Nutmeg Nanny. In her spare time she enjoys developing recipes, baking and cooking. She is a small town girl who left the corn fields of Ohio for the scenic beauty of the Hudson Valley region of New ...

Traditional treats!

Who knew Irish soda bread could be made so many different ways! Sweet, savory and totally traditional. We have all the bases covered!

Irish Soda Bread

Irish soda bread is a classic St. Patrick's Day treat. It can be savory, sweet, traditional and a little nontraditional. We have taken four recipes to give you a selection of breads you won't be able to resist!

Irish soda bread with raisins and orange zest recipe

Adapted from Ina Garten

Yields 1 loaf

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 4 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes
  • 1-3/4 cups cold buttermilk
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • 2 teaspoons grated orange zest
  • 1 cup dried raisins
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F and prepare a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone mat.
  2. In a bowl of an electric mixer add flour, sugar, baking soda and cubed butter. Using the paddle attachment blend on medium speed until the butter is worked into the flour.
  3. In a large measuring cup, add buttermilk, egg and orange zest. Whisk together until combined.
  4. With the mixer on low, add the buttermilk mixture to the flour mixture. Mix the raisins with 1 tablespoon flour and add to the bread mixture in the mixer. Mix until combined, the dough will be wet but will hold up.
  5. Flour a large work surface and dump out the dough. Knead a few times until the dough comes together. Shape the dough into a round loaf.
  6. Add loaf to the prepared parchment-lined baking sheet, cut an X into the top of the loaf (using a serrated knife works best) and bake for 45-55 minutes. When the bread is ready, the loaf will sound "hollow" when you tap on the top.
  7. Let cool and enjoy toasted with butter or jam.

Irish soda bread with rosemary and black pepper recipe

Adapted from Epicurious

Yields 2 loaves

Ingredients:

  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 3-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup old-fashioned oats
  • 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
  • 1/2 tablespoon chopped thyme
  • 1/2 tablespoon chopped rosemary
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
  • 1-3/4 cups buttermilk
  • 3 teaspoons olive oil

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Set aside.
  2. In a small saucepan, add butter and cook over medium heat until the butter turns amber brown in color and smells nutty. You will notice little brown bits at the bottom the pan, this is normal and make sure to include them when mixing the butter.
  3. In a large bowl add flour, oats, brown sugar, thyme, rosemary, baking soda, salt and black pepper. Whisk to combine.
  4. Pour buttermilk and browned butter into the flour mixture. Using a fork or a wooden spoon mix together until the dough is just combined and moist.
  5. Flour a large work surface and dump out the dough. Knead a few times until the dough comes together. Divide the dough into two equal pieces and shape into two small loaves.
  6. Add both loaves to the parchment-lined baking sheet and cut an X into the top of each loaf, using a serrated knife works best. Brush each loaf with a little olive oil and sprinkle with a little extra fresh ground pepper.
  7. Bake for about 45 minutes, let cool and serve plain or with butter.

Classic white Irish soda bread recipe

Yields 1 loaf

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 to 1-1/2 cups buttermilk

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl whisk together the flour, salt and baking soda.
  3. Slowly stir in buttermilk with a wooden spoon until the mixture is combined. If the bread is too dry and won't hold together, add more buttermilk, 1 tablespoon at a time, to the mixture until the desired consistency is met.
  4. Flour a large work surface and dump out the dough. Knead a few times until the dough comes together. Shape the dough into a somewhat flat round loaf.
  5. Add loaf to the prepared parchment-lined baking sheet, cut an X into the top of the loaf (using a serrated knife works best) and bake for about 45 minutes.
  6. Let cool and serve with butter or jam.

Whole wheat Irish soda bread recipe

Adapted from Claire Robinson

Yields 1 loaf

Ingredients:

  •  1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3 cups whole wheat flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1/2 cup old-fashioned oats
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons caraway seeds
  • 1-1/2 to 2 cups buttermilk

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl add all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, baking soda, oats, salt and caraway seeds. Whisk together to combine.
  3. Slowly stir in buttermilk with a wooden spoon until the mixture is combined. If the bread is too dry and won't hold together add more buttermilk, 1 tablespoon at a time, to the mixture until the desired consistancy is met.
  4. Flour a large work surface and dump out the dough. Knead a few times until the dough comes together. Shape the dough into a somewhat flat round loaf.
  5. Add loaf to the prepared parchment lined baking sheet, cut an X into the top of the loaf (using a serrated knife works best) and bake for about 7 minutes at 425 degrees F and lower temperature to 375 degrees F and bake for another 20 - 25 minutes.
  6. Let cool and enjoy with butter.

More bread recipes

Steamed pumpkin bread recipe
King cake pull-apart bread recipe
All-Bran banana nut bread recipe

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