What would you like to know?
Share this Story

5 Foodie books you should be reading

Karen Miner is the Associate Editor for SheKnows Food. She is a freelance writer, recipe developer and is also the cook, author and photographer behind the food blog, Tasty Trials, a collection of original recipes and stories. She and he...

Books for foodies

Cookbooks aren't the only food-related books out there. These books for foodies should be on your must-read list.
Book sandwich

Books for foodies

Cookbooks aren't the only food-related books out there. These books for foodies should be on your must-read list.

If you find yourself reading cookbooks like a novel, cover to cover, these nonfiction foodie books are for you. Whether you're getting insight into the minds and lives of famous chefs, learning the history of food and gastronomy or training yourself to appreciate what you're eating, you're sure to be entertained as you read through these pages.

Love foodie fiction? Don't miss these delicious reads >>

1

Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child

Written by Bob Spitz

Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child

Published just in time for the celebration of her 100th birthday, Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child, gives us a wonderful biography of an incredible woman. There's always room for another Julia Child book on the bookshelf — who can get enough of the always entertaining, always endearing host of The French Chef? Bob Spitz details the life of Child, from wartime to the lifelong romance with her husband to the writing and great success of her tome, Mastering the Art of French Cooking. If you want to learn more about Julia Child, this is a great place to start.

2

Yes, Chef: A Memoir

Written by Marcus Samuelsson

Yes, Chef: A Memoir

Marcus Samuelsson is an award-winning and world-renowned chef, but that might be all you know about him. In his book, Yes, Chef: A Memoir, Samuelsson provides an intimate insight into how he became the man he did, starting with his Swedish grandmother who he credits with instilling in him his love of cooking. His journey from Ethiopia to Sweden to France and New York is fascinating, but Samuelsson says it wasn't always easy. This personal account is a must for foodies who can't get enough of the world's top chefs.

3

Restaurant Man

Written by Joe Bastianich

Restaurant Man

There's no denying that Joe Bastianich knows his way around a restaurant. His mother is Lidia Bastianch, which alones gives him plenty of cred, but he's also Mario Batali's business partner and a successful restaurateur in his own right. In his memoir, Restaurant Man, Bastianich details an insider's view of the New York dining scene, down to the nitty gritty and not so pretty. He pulls no punches in his candid discussion about the industry and the people in it. Although it has ruffled some feathers along the way, this book is full of food-related entertainment.

4

The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat: Craig Claiborne
and the American Food Renaissance

Written by Thomas McNamee

The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat: Craig Claiborne and the American Food Renaissance

The culinary scene may not be what it is today if not for Craig Claiborne. But in 1957, as the new food editor for the New York Times, he began to make his mark on the food world. In the biography, The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat: Craig Claiborne and the American Food Renaissance, Thomas McNamee charts how Claiborne transformed the Times food section, paved the way as a restaurant critic, influenced food trends and more. This is a must-read for an intriguing look into the life of food pioneer.

5

Taste What You're Missing: The Passionate Eater's Guide to Why Good Food Tastes Good

Written by Barb Stuckey

Taste What You’re Missing: The Passionate Eater’s Guide to Why Good Food Tastes Good

Did you ever actually learn how to taste food properly? Barb Stuckey doesn't think so. In her book, Taste What You're Missing: The Passionate Eater's Guide to Why Good Food Tastes Good, she suggests that a lot of what we think we know about the way we taste food is incorrect. Stuckey says that much of the way individuals taste their food is determined by genetics and other factors, and that the actual flavor in our mouths is a very small portion of the overall tasting experience. This book takes you through experiments in tasting and teaches the reader to taste food for the best results. If you like mixing science with your food, this one's for you.

More for foodies

Famous Foodie Profile: Cat Cora
Best US cities for foodies
Checking In: Hotels for foodies

Recommended for You
Comments
Hot
New in Food & Recipes
Close

And you'll see personalized content just for you whenever you click the My Feed .

SheKnows is making some changes!