Nutrition From
Under The Sea

Confused about how much fish to eat — and what kind? We've got answers.

(page 3 of 4)


3. What are some easy ways to eat more fish?

Try "pizza fish," advises Joan Salge Blake, R.D., a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association: Coat Pacific cod, farmed rainbow trout, or American tilapia with a chunky tomato sauce, sprinkle on low-fat mozzarella or Parmesan cheese and basil, and bake. American shrimp, mussels, and farmed bay scallops are easy to sneak into pasta sauces and stir-fries. "And I love to make salmon burgers," says Blake. Mix canned salmon with egg whites, breadcrumbs, and seasonings, shape into burgers, and grill.

"Eating out is also a great time to get your fish in, because you'll see it prepared in ways you'd never do at home, and it's usually the healthiest option on the menu," says Blake. "It's automatic portion control — they might give you a huge steak, but they never give you too many scallops." If you're eating sushi, limit salmon (sake), shrimp (ebi), and tuna (maguro), which tend to be high in mercury. Better choices: Atlantic mackerel (saba), farmed clams, oysters, squid (ika), and crab (kani).


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