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The one leaked Clinton email that matters the most: Risottogate

Adriana Velez is Food Editor for SheKnows. She spent her formative years in Brooklyn, which pretty much explains everything about her. She now lives somewhere else and has discovered life after kale and kombucha. She's written for Civil ...

Looks like one Clinton Foundation collaborator's contributions extended to the kitchen

Of all the revelations that came from the WikiLeaks "October Surprise" bank of Clinton emails, this is the one that surprised us the most. One Merrill Lynch financial adviser's influence extends far beyond the Clinton Foundation. It goes straight into Clinton campaign chair John Podesta's... kitchen?

More: The easiest, creamiest oven-baked risotto

Yes, kitchen. Among the leaked emails is this conversation between Podesta and Peter Huffman, who has worked with the Clinton Foundation. It's about risotto. Pay attention, because this is pretty crucial information.

Podesta asks:

So I have been making a lot of risotto lately...and regardless of the recipe, I more/less adhere to every step you taught me. Question: why do I use a 1/4 or 1/2 a cup of stock at a time? Why can't you just add 1 or 2 cups of stock at a time b/c the arborio rice will eventually absorb it anyway, right?

Huffman replies:

Yes and no Yes it with absorb the liquid, but no that's not what you want to do. The slower add process and stirring causes the rice to give up it's starch which gives the risotto it's creamy consistency. You won't get that if you dump all that liquid at once.

So. Podesta. Trying to take shortcuts on your risotto? Trying to game the process? Tsk-tsk, I am disappointed.

More: Gluten-free cauliflower cream risotto

I'm kidding. I make my risotto in a pressure cooker, so I'm not one to talk. I do toast the grains first, then let it absorb about a cup of white wine. But then I add all the stock at once and cook the whole thing for about seven to eight minutes. And you know what? Stir in some freshly grated Parmesan at the end, and it's plenty creamy. You'd be surprised.

More: 9 foods you didn't know you can cook in a pressure cooker

There are a couple of different ways you could view this revealing email. Either Podesta is a total cheater in all things, or he's simply a smart person who questions everything and looks to find the most efficient means to a goal. I think it says a lot that he had the curiosity to keep asking about risotto.

Hat tip to Epicurious.

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