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How to make homemade Butterfingers from leftover candy corn

I'm a writer who loves to bake.  While I chase my dreams of being a bestselling novelist and screenwriter, I blog about my adventures in baking and writing.  I also love fashion, beauty, exercise, and TV and movies.

You won't waste a single candy corn once you discover how to make your own Butterfingers

As a kid, I didn’t like dressing up for Halloween. We had to dress up for school, and I distinctly remember going as one of the aunts from Sabrina, the Teenage Witch (I was that cool) and Britney Spears so I could wear regular clothes. I didn’t go out trick-or-treating, and I wasn’t into watching scary movies.

For me, Halloween was all about one thing and one thing only — candy. I loved making treat bags to hand out at school, doling out handfuls to the kids that rang our doorbell and creating a stash just for me.

Flash-forward to about fifteen years later. I still don’t dress up, and I certainly don’t go trick-or-treating, but I’m as obsessed as ever with Halloween candy. You should see my pantry — or maybe you shouldn’t.

A lot of candies go quickly. Since I’m allergic to chocolate (I know), sour gummy pumpkins are like gold in my house. They disappear without warning. One candy that I know sticks around in houses across the country, and probably across the world, is candy corn.

Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy a couple pieces of candy corn now and then, but more than that and even my sweet tooth can’t handle it. So, what do you do with all that leftover candy corn, staring at you, nearing its expiration date (do you even still have some from last year, just like me)?

You make Butterfingers.

I know, more candy; but homemade candy is a real treat. Plus, it’s fun to make with kids. You can make them now and stash them in the freezer to use as holiday gifts — or snack on when the craving strikes.

The magic starts with candy corn and peanut butter. It really is kind of like magic how these two ingredients taste just like the inside of a Butterfinger. They have a great peanut flavor with a bit of chew and plenty of sweetness thanks to the candy corn.

Now, it’s time for the coating. Like I mentioned, I’m allergic to chocolate, so I used carob chips to coat my homemade candy, but you can use white, milk or dark chocolate — whatever sounds good. I think dark would work best since the base is rather sweet, but experiment if you like.

Now, you’ll be buying extra candy corn just so you can make more Butterfingers!

You won't waste a single candy corn once you discover how to make your own Butterfingers
Image: Laura Dembowski/SheKnows

Homemade Butterfingers recipe

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups candy corn
  • 1-1/2 cups creamy peanut butter
  • About 24 ounces dark, milk or white chocolate or carob chips
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable shortening

Directions:

  1. Line an 8-inch square pan with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. In a large microwave-safe bowl, melt the candy corn in 30-second increments on high, stirring in-between until it is almost fully melted.
  3. Add the peanut butter and stir to combine.
  4. Continue to microwave in 30-second increments, stirring in-between, until the mixture is fully melted and combined.
  5. Pour into the prepared pan and smooth into an even layer. Work quickly because it hardens fast.
  6. Refrigerate until firm, at least 2 hours and up to overnight.
  7. Once the base is firm, cut it into bite-sized pieces using a sharp knife, serrated works best since it is difficult to cut through.
  8. Melt the coating of your choice — carob, white, milk or dark chocolate chips — with the shortening in the microwave in 30-second increments, stirring in between.
  9. Once melted, coat the pieces of the candy.
  10. Set on a parchment lined baking sheet.
  11. Once all the candies have been coated, place the sheet in the refrigerator until they are firm, about an hour.
  12. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week, or freeze, wrapped in plastic and foil and placed in a zipper bag for up to 3 months.
  13. Thaw at room temperature for about 1 hour.
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