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Moringa: Get cooking with this miracle green that's healthier than kale

Rebecca Bracken is a news and views writer.






Moringa is the healthiest green you've never heard of — here's how to use it in your cooking

Moringa is a tree that grows around the area of the Himalayas, India, Pakistan and Africa and boasts health benefits and nutrition that sound nothing short of magical.

It's reported to be crazy nutritious, packed with more protein than yogurt, more calcium than milk and more potassium than a banana. It is said to fight cancer, diabetes, heart disease and more. Oh, and it’s totally delicious.

So how can you get more of the Moringa “miracle tree” in your own daily cooking? There are lots of ways to eat Moringa, since the entire tree is edible.

Moringa can be found fresh online and at many Southeast Asian markets, sometimes with names like “Malongai” or “Malunggay,” as it’s called in Tagalog. The taste of Moringa is nutty with a hint of horseradish and can be eaten in all sorts of ways.

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Moringa flowers

Moringa flowers need to be cooked slightly before eating and can be thrown into almost any salad, soup or egg dish and even on top of pizza. Sauté them, but one note: Don't go crazy. Eaten in large quantities, Moringa leaves can have a laxative effect.

Moringa drumsticks

The drumsticks are the root or stem of the Moringa tree and can be prepared all sorts of ways, from pan-fried drumstick cutlets or drumstick curry.

Powdered Moringa

Powdered Moringa is easy to find at most health food stores and the simplest way to incorporate Moringa into your cooking. Throw powdered Moringa into a smoothie, or make your own Moringa tea.

More: The 4 healthiest green vegetables

Fresh Moringa leaves

Fresh Moringa leaves can be thrown into a salad or sautéed like spinach or any other green.

Moringa seeds and pods

Every part of the tree is edible, so even the pods and seeds can be used to make soups and crunchy seasonings for a variety of recipes. Use the seeds and pods as a substitute for green beans in any recipe or sautéed and eaten alone.

Moringa oil

Moringa oil is becoming a popular ingredient in bath, body and skin care products. It's not used for cooking, so don't swap it for your fave EVOO.

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So give Moringa a try, and let us know your favorite way to eat it. We have a feeling you'll be seeing a lot more of this tasty little tree popping up in your favorite foods and recipes very soon.

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