When Thanksgiving And Hanukkah Meet!

Thanksgiving and Hanukkah fall on the same day this year making it one epic food holiday — Thanksgivukkah! We've put together a great menu celebrating this rare occurrence.

 The ultimate Thanksgivukkah menu

1

Sweet potato beet latkes
with horseradish-sour cream sauce recipe

What would Thanksgiving be without sweet potatoes on the table? For a Hanukkah spin, we're making latkes and topping them with a tangy horseradish-sour cream sauce.

 The ultimate Thanksgivukkah menu

Serves 6-8

Ingredients:

  • 2 large sweet potatoes, cut into large chunks
  • 1 large yellow onion, cut in half and divided
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/3 cup canned sliced beets, drained
  • Vegetable or canola oil for frying
  • 3 tablespoons sour cream
  • 2 teaspoons prepared horseradish

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, flour, salt and baking powder. Dice 1/2 of the onion and add to the bowl. Combine everything with a spatula.
  2. Using the grater attachment on a food processor (alternatively, grate by hand), grate the sweet potatoes, the other 1/2 onion and the beets.
  3. Transfer the mixture to a thin kitchen towel and squeeze as much liquid out of the mixture as possible.
  4. Add the mixture to the large bowl and toss together with a spatula.
  5. In a large, deep-bottomed skillet, add enough oil to cover the bottom of the pan and rise up against the sides about 1/2 inch. Heat over medium heat.
  6. Once the oil is hot, take about 1/4 cup of the sweet potato mixture and squeeze excess liquid out of it again. Form into a patty in your hands and drop into the hot oil. Fry the latke for about 3 minutes on each side until golden brown.
  7. With a slotted spoon, carefully transfer the fried latkes from the skillet to a baking sheet lined with a cooling rack so the excess grease drips off the latkes.
  8. Repeat process with remaining batter, adding oil to the pan as necessary.
  9. Once all the latkes are cooked, combine the sour cream and horseradish in a small bowl and top each latke with a dollop of it. Garnish with some diced beets. Serve warm
2

Green beans with cranberries and crispy pastrami recipe

No green bean casseroles this year! We're taking a simple side dish and giving it some holiday flair with cranberries and a crispy pastrami and shallot topping.

 The ultimate Thanksgivukkah menu

Serves 6

Ingredients:

  • 1-1/2 pounds green beans, trimmed and washed
  • 1 large shallot, chopped
  • 1/2 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/8 pound pastrami, cut into thin strips
  • 1/2 cup fresh cranberries
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Add the green beans to a large skillet with just enough water to cover the bottom of the pan. Cover and bring to a boil. Let boil for about 3 minutes, they should still be crunchy but cooked. Drain the green beans and set aside.
  2. In the same skillet, add the butter and olive oil over medium heat. Once melted, add the shallots and pastrami and let them saute together until crispy (about 5-7 minutes). Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate.
  3. Add the green beans back into the skillet with the cranberries, season with the salt and pepper and saute for 3 minutes until the cranberries are heated and starting to wrinkle/pop.
  4. Plate the green beans and top with the shallot/pastrami mixture.
  5. Serve warm.
3

Challah, apple, leek and turkey stuffing recipe

We're taking stuffing from a side dish to the main entree with this Thanksgivukkah version. Using challah bread makes it buttery and delicious while the apples, leeks and turkey give it some great depth of flavor and staying power.

 The ultimate Thanksgivukkah menu

Serves 6-8

Turkey (alternatively, you can use leftover cooked turkey)

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds split turkey breast
  • 3 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Place the turkey in a baking dish.
  2. Peel the skin back and stuff the cloves of garlic and half of the rosemary underneath.
  3. Season the entire breast with the remaining rosemary, lemon juice, olive oil and salt and pepper.
  4. Cook in a 325 degree F oven until a thermometer reads 160 degrees F, about 2 hours. Remove from oven and let rest for 20 minutes.
  5. Transfer to a cutting board and shred using two forks. Set aside.

Stuffing

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups shredded turkey
  • 1 loaf challah, cut into cubes and dried out in a warm oven
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 large leeks, chopped
  • 2 Granny Smith apples, chopped
  • 3 pieces celery, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon rosemary, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon sage, chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 cups chicken, turkey or vegetable broth

Directions:

  1. Heat the butter and olive oil in a large pot over medium heat.
  2. Add the leeks, apples, celery, rosemary, sage and salt and pepper to the pot and saute until softened, about 5-7 minutes.
  3. Place the cubed challah bread in a large bowl, add the apple, leek and celery mixture to the bowl once cooked. Add the shredded turkey and toss to combine.
  4. Pour the broth into the bowl and toss to combine with a spatula until everything is completely mixed.
  5. Transfer the mixture to a baking dish and press down firmly on the top.
  6. Cover with foil and bake in a 350 degree F oven for 30 minutes.
  7. Remove the foil and broil for 5 minutes until the top is golden brown and crispy.
  8. Remove from the oven and serve warm.
4

Pumpkin pie rugelach recipe

No regular pumpkin pie on this Thanksgivukkah table! Pumpkin pie and rugelach meet in these delicious buttery, cream cheese, bite-size desserts. They're so much easier to make than you think, too!

 The ultimate Thanksgivukkah menu

Makes about 2 dozen

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 6 tablespoons cold butter, cut into 1 tablespoon pieces
  • 1/2 cup cold cream cheese, cut into 4 pieces
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin puree
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon heavy cream
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/2 cup chopped pecans (or other nut)
  • 1 egg
  • Water

Directions:

  1. Combine the flour and salt in a medium bowl.
  2. Add the butter and cream cheese pieces and mix with a hand mixer on a low speed until incorporated. The dough will be crumbly in texture.
  3. Form two balls using your hands with the dough, shape into discs and wrap in plastic. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours.
  4. Remove the dough from the refrigerator.
  5. On a floured wooden surface, roll the dough out into a circle about 12 inches in diameter. You want to keep it as circular as possible so folding the edges over and rerolling as you go is OK.
  6. Combine the pumpkin, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, heavy cream and vanilla in a small bowl.
  7. Spoon half the mixture onto the dough and spread evenly around the entire circle, leaving just a bit of the edge (about 1/4 inch) dry.
  8. Sprinkle half the chopped nuts on top.
  9. With a pizza cutter, cut the dough into 12 even pieces.
  10. Roll each piece up starting from the outside to the small tip.
  11. Press the tip into the roll to keep the roll tight as it bakes.
  12. Place each rugelach on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  13. Whisk together the egg and a couple tablespoons of water in a small bowl.
  14. Brush each rugelach with the egg wash and place in a 350 degree F oven for 20-22 minutes, until they start to turn golden brown on the edges.
  15. Remove from oven, let cool for a couple of minutes and serve.

More Hanukkah recipes

A fried feast for Hanukkah
Classic potato latkes
A hip and modern Hanukkah menu

Tags:

Recommended for you

Comments

Comments on "The ultimate Thanksgivukkah menu"

Lauralee Hensley November 13, 2013 | 11:59 PM

Challah sounds delicious, but the other recipe that has horseradish in it I will pass. I can't handle horseradish. My husband had some horseradish on cheddar chips the other day. He laughed at me when I ate one tiny bite and spit it right out. I warned him I didn't like it, haven't since I was a kid. I'm not Jewish, but we had Jewish neighbors and my mom always helped the mom there (since she had a genetic slow type of muscular dystrophy) at their home to get it ready for the Jewish Holidays. You know changing out of the dishes, cleaning everything. Getting rid of older foods to bring in the foods they needed for certain holidays. Well after their holidays they often gave my mom some of the foods when they had them left to thank her for her help. I loved the macaroons they always ended up giving my mom. Yet, no, no, no, horseradish for this girl.

+ Add Comment


(required - not published)