What would you like to know?
Share this Story

FDA announces gluten-free labeling requirements

Patricia Conte has a background in marketing communications and works as an independent writer. In 2010, she was given the opportunity to combine her love of writing and food when she started as a contributing writer for the Food channel...

The food you eat

Today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a decision regarding food labeling, in particular, voluntary labeling for gluten-free products.

Woman reading food label

What this means

Now, thanks to the FDA's decision, in order for companies to use the term "gluten-free" on a food or food product label, the food must meet all the requirements of the definition and contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten. This applies to similarly worded claims such as "free of gluten," "without gluten" and "no gluten."

"Adherence to a gluten-free diet is the key to treating celiac disease, which can be very disruptive to everyday life," said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. "The FDA's new 'gluten-free' definition will help people with this condition make food choices with confidence and allow them to better manage their health."

In the community

A recent survey conducted by Glutino (the 2013 Glutino Survey for Gluten-Free Labeling) revealed that one in five Americans lives, or know someone who lives, a gluten-free lifestyle, and 86 percent of consumers have seen gluten-free products offered in their supermarkets. Glutino and Udi's are gluten-free brands owned by Boulder Brands. "We are thrilled by the FDA's decision to regulate gluten-free labeling, something Glutino and Udi's have been supporting for several years," said TJ McIntyre, executive vice president for Boulder Brands.

Details on celiac disease

Celiac disease is an immune reaction to eating gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. If you have celiac disease, eating gluten triggers an immune response in your small intestine. Over time, this reaction produces inflammation that damages the small intestine's lining and prevents absorption of some nutrients. This can cause reactions like bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, pain and other symptoms.

The FDA notes that up to 3 million Americans have celiac disease, which is only managed effectively by eating a gluten-free diet.

Try one of these gluten-free recipes

Gluten free recipes

More gluten-free recipes

Lentil salad with mustard vinaigrette
Zucchini "fries"
Eggplant boats with millet and vegetables

Recommended for You
Comments
Hot
New in Food & Recipes
Close

And you'll see personalized content just for you whenever you click the My Feed .

SheKnows is making some changes!