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16 Books to Curl Up With on Winter Days

#1/17:

Get your winter cuddle on

Design: Ashley Britton
#1/17:

Get your winter cuddle on

Sure, daylight saving time sucks because it now gets dark at 5:30 p.m. every night. If you're like me, you're already craving the return of the sunshine. (It's almost enough to make me miss Arizona, a state that is at least smart enough to ditch the time change.) But, on the upside, the oncoming winter means all the more time for fireplaces, hot tea and, of course, a good book.

This season, authors are not disappointing with the new selections hitting the shelves and a few old favorites that are finding their way back onto the best-seller lists. Whether you're in the mood for political parody or YA romance, there is sure to be a book on this list that will keep you company during those long winter nights.

Click through to find the buzz-worthy books that are must-reads for winter 2017.

#3/17:

'Follow Me' by Sara Shepard

#3/17:

'Follow Me' by Sara Shepard

This is the second book in the Amateurs series by Sara Shepard, the author of Pretty Little Liars.

It was the perfect night for a party.

That is, until 21-year-old Chelsea Dawson disappeared. The social media star was last seen enjoying a beautiful summer night at the Jersey Shore with her friends. But after an explosive fight with her ex-boyfriend, she vanished without a trace.

#4/17:

'Darker' by E L James

#4/17:

'Darker' by E L James

E L James continues the saga of Fifty Shades of Grey by retelling the second book from Christian's perspective.

E L James revisits the world of Fifty Shades with a deeper and darker take on the love story that has enthralled millions of readers around the globe.

Their scorching, sensual affair ended in heartbreak and recrimination, but Christian Grey cannot get Anastasia Steele out of his mind, or his blood. Determined to win her back, he tries to suppress his darkest desires and his need for complete control, and to love Ana on her own terms.

#5/17:

'Year One' by Nora Roberts

#5/17:

'Year One' by Nora Roberts

Nora Roberts is known for her romance novels, but Year One is a step into the trendy sci-fi/fantasy genre.

It began on New Year’s Eve.

The sickness came on suddenly, and spread quickly. The fear spread even faster. Within weeks, everything people counted on began to fail them. The electrical grid sputtered; law and government collapsed ― and more than half of the world’s population was decimated.

Where there had been order, there was now chaos. And as the power of science and technology receded, magick rose up in its place. Some of it is good, like the witchcraft worked by Lana Bingham, practicing in the loft apartment she shares with her lover, Max. Some of it is unimaginably evil, and it can lurk anywhere, around a corner, in fetid tunnels beneath the river ― or in the ones you know and love the most.

#6/17:

'Renegades' by Marissa Meyer

#6/17:

'Renegades' by Marissa Meyer

The author of The Lunar Chronicles is back with a new series. Renegades is the first book in the trilogy of the same name.

The Renegades are a syndicate of prodigies ― humans with extraordinary abilities ― who emerged from the ruins of a crumbled society and established peace and order where chaos reigned. As champions of justice, they remain a symbol of hope and courage to everyone... except the villains they once overthrew.

Nova has a reason to hate the Renegades, and she is on a mission for vengeance. As she gets closer to her target, she meets Adrian, a Renegade boy who believes in justice ― and in Nova. But Nova's allegiance is to the villains who have the power to end them both.

 

#7/17:

'War of the Cards' by Colleen Oakes

#7/17:

'War of the Cards' by Colleen Oakes

Colleen Oakes' breakout retelling of the origin story of the Queen of Hearts from Alice in Wonderland is not to be missed. This is the final book in the series.

Dinah has lost everyone she ever loved. Her brother was brutally murdered. The wicked man she believed was her father betrayed her. Her loyal subjects have been devastated by war. And the boy she gave her heart to broke it completely.

Now a dark queen has risen out of the ashes of her former life.

#8/17:

'Future Home of the Living God' by Louise Erdrich

#8/17:

'Future Home of the Living God' by Louise Erdrich

Louise Erdrich has been dubbed one of the greatest living American authors, and her latest novel is drawing all sorts of must-read buzz.
 
The world as we know it is ending. Evolution has reversed itself, affecting every living creature on earth. Science cannot stop the world from running backwards, as woman after woman gives birth to infants that appear to be primitive species of humans. Thirty-two-year-old Cedar Hawk Songmaker, adopted daughter of a pair of big-hearted, open-minded Minneapolis liberals, is as disturbed and uncertain as the rest of America around her. But for Cedar, this change is profound and deeply personal. She is four months pregnant.
#9/17:

'The Revolution of Marina M.' by Janet Fitch

#9/17:

'The Revolution of Marina M.' by Janet Fitch

Janet Fitch, the author of White Oleander and Paint It Black, returns with another historical novel that is sure to draw us all in.

St. Petersburg, New Year's Eve, 1916. Marina Makarova is a young woman of privilege who aches to break free of the constraints of her genteel life, a life about to be violently upended by the vast forces of history. Swept up on these tides, Marina will join the marches for workers' rights, fall in love with a radical young poet and betray everything she holds dear before being betrayed in turn.

As her country goes through almost unimaginable upheaval, Marina's own coming-of-age unfolds, marked by deep passion and devastating loss, and the private heroism of an ordinary woman living through extraordinary times. This is the epic, mesmerizing story of one indomitable woman's journey through some of the most dramatic events of the last century.

#10/17:

'Bonfire' by Krysten Ritter

#10/17:

'Bonfire' by Krysten Ritter

The debut novel from Krysten Ritter, who plays Jessica Jones in the Marvel series on Netflix.

It has been 10 years since Abby Williams left home and scrubbed away all visible evidence of her small-town roots. Now working as an environmental lawyer in Chicago, she has a thriving career, a modern apartment and her pick of meaningless one-night stands.

But when a new case takes her back home to Barrens, Indiana, the life Abby painstakingly created begins to crack. Tasked with investigating Optimal Plastics, the town’s most high-profile company and economic heart, Abby begins to find strange connections to Barrens’s biggest scandal from more than a decade ago, involving the popular Kaycee Mitchell and her closest friends — just before Kaycee disappeared for good.

#11/17:

'Artemis' by Andy Weir

#11/17:

'Artemis' by Andy Weir

Andy Weir, author of The Martian, continues his story in space, this time with a female protagonist.

Jazz Bashara is a criminal.

Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you’re not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you've got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent.

Everything changes when Jazz sees the chance to commit the perfect crime, with a reward too lucrative to turn down. But pulling off the impossible is just the start of her problems, as she learns that she's stepped square into a conspiracy for control of Artemis itself — and that now, her only chance at survival lies in a gambit even riskier than the first.

#12/17:

'You Can't Spell America Without Me' by Alec Baldwin

#12/17:

'You Can't Spell America Without Me' by Alec Baldwin

Basically, it's Alec Baldwin's SNL version of Donald Trump made into a book. Priceless.

Political satire as deeper truth: Donald Trump’s presidential memoir, as written by Alec Baldwin and Kurt Andersen, two world-renowned Trump scholars and experts on greatness generally.

#13/17:

'We're Going to Need More Wine' by Gabrielle Union

#13/17:

'We're Going to Need More Wine' by Gabrielle Union

Gabrielle Union's book is one of those memoirs that just shouldn't be missed.

In this moving collection of thought-provoking essays infused with her unique wisdom and deep humor, Union uses fearlessness to tell astonishingly personal and true stories about power, color, gender, feminism and fame. Union tackles a range of experiences, including bullying, beauty standards and competition between women in Hollywood, growing up in white California suburbia and then spending summers with her black relatives in Nebraska, coping with crushes, puberty and the divorce of her parents. Genuine and perceptive, Union bravely lays herself bare, uncovering a complex and courageous life of self-doubt and self-discovery with incredible poise and brutal honesty. Throughout, she compels us to be ethical and empathetic and reminds us of the importance of confidence, self-awareness and the power of sharing truth, laughter and support.

#14/17:

'Alias Grace' by Margaret Atwood

#14/17:

'Alias Grace' by Margaret Atwood

Alias Grace was originally published in 1996, but Netflix has recently turned it into a mini-series like Hulu did with The Handmaid's Tale, another of Margaret Atwood's classics.

Grace Marks has been convicted for her involvement in the vicious murders of her employer, Thomas Kinnear, and Nancy Montgomery, his housekeeper and mistress. Some believe Grace is innocent; others think her evil or insane. Now serving a life sentence, Grace claims to have no memory of the murders.

Dr. Simon Jordan, an up-and-coming expert in the burgeoning field of mental illness, is engaged by a group of reformers and spiritualists who seek a pardon for Grace. He listens to her story while bringing her closer and closer to the day she cannot remember. What will he find in attempting to unlock her memories? Is Grace a female fiend? A bloodthirsty femme fatale? Or is she the victim of circumstances?

#15/17:

'Brave' by Jennifer L. Armentrout

#15/17:

'Brave' by Jennifer L. Armentrout

The final book in Jennifer L. Armentrout's Wicked trilogy.

Ivy Morgan hasn't been feeling like herself lately. Not like anyone can blame her. After all, being held captive by a psychotic fae prince hell-bent on permanently opening the gates to the Otherworld is bound to leave some mental scars.

It’s more than that, though. Something dark and insidious is spreading throughout Ivy, more powerful than she could ever imagine... and it’s coming between her and the man she’s fallen deeply in love with, elite Order member Ren Owens.

Ren would do anything to keep Ivy safe. Anything. But when he makes a life-altering choice for her, the fallout of his act has far-reaching consequences that threaten to tear their lives apart.

#16/17:

'Roomies' by Christina Lauren

#16/17:

'Roomies' by Christina Lauren

This fun chick-lit read is sure to warm you up on those especially cold winter days.

For months, Holland Bakker has invented excuses to descend into the subway station near her apartment, drawn to the captivating music performed by her street musician crush. Lacking the nerve to actually talk to the gorgeous stranger, fate steps in one night in the form of a drunken attacker. Calvin McLoughlin rescues her but quickly disappears when the police start asking questions.

Using the only resource she has to pay the brilliant musician back, Holland gets Calvin an audition with her uncle, Broadway’s hottest musical director. When the tryout goes better than even Holland could have imagined, Calvin is set for a great entry into Broadway — until his reason for disappearing earlier becomes clear: he’s in the country illegally, his student visa having expired years ago.

Seeing that her uncle needs Calvin as much as Calvin needs him, a wild idea takes hold of her. Impulsively, she marries the Irishman, her infatuation a secret only to him. As their relationship evolves and Calvin becomes the darling of Broadway — in the middle of the theatrics and the acting-not-acting — will Holland and Calvin to realize that they both stopped pretending a long time ago?

#17/17:

'The Vanishing Season' by Joanna Schaffhausen

#17/17:

'The Vanishing Season' by Joanna Schaffhausen

As the winner of the Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Crime Novel Competition, Joanna Schaffhausen's book has been getting buzz for a while now.

Ellery Hathaway knows a thing or two about serial killers, but not through her police training. She's an officer in sleepy Woodbury, Massachusetts, where a bicycle theft still makes the newspapers. No one there knows she was once victim No. 17 in the grisly story of serial killer Francis Michael Coben. The only one who lived.

When three people disappear from her town in three years ― all around her birthday ― Ellery fears someone knows her secret. Someone very dangerous. Her superiors dismiss her concerns, but Ellery knows the vanishing season is coming and anyone could be next. She contacts the one man she knows will believe her: the FBI agent who saved her from a killer all those years ago.

Agent Reed Markham made his name and fame on the back of the Coben case, but his fortunes have since turned. His marriage is in shambles, his bosses think he's washed up, and worst of all, he blew a major investigation. When Ellery calls him, he can’t help but wonder: sure, he rescued her, but was she ever truly saved? His greatest triumph is Ellery’s waking nightmare, and now both of them are about to be sucked into the past, back to the case that made them... with a killer who can't let go.

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