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Voices in Eric McCormack's head helps him solve crimes

Jaclyn is an Idaho native who currently lives in Milwaukee. Having worked in radio, TV and as a newspaper reporter, she is an avid pop culture and news junkie. She also has a passion for photography and cooking (but is still learning to ...

His new show starts this Monday

It's been six years since the end of Will & Grace, but Eric McCormack is hoping the new phase of crime dramas will be his next longterm project.

Eric McCormackFor most of us, Eric McCormack will always be known as Will, the gay lawyer who paired up perfectly with Debra Messing in Will & Grace. The show lasted for eight seasons until it ended in 2006.

But now, McCormack is finally moving on with his new show.

“In TNT's new summer drama Perception premiering Monday, McCormack stars as Dr. Daniel Pierce, a scruffy neuroscientist and professor who helps the federal government solve difficult cases with the help of his own multiple voices,” said the LA Times. “He is, after all, [a] paranoid schizophrenic.”

"I'm sure all of the critics will say there's fatigue there," McCormack told the LA Times. "But I don't think the critical fatigue reflects the audience interest.”

The show follows McCormack’s character who is a brilliant instructor on the human brain. But when he leaves the classroom he is an awkward personality. His disease and background lend him to solving crimes, in what McCormack calls the new phase of crime shows.

"I think we're in the third phase of mystery shows," the actor said. "In the '60s and '70s, we had Columbo and Quincy M.E. — it was their personality as they solved a mystery. Then we go into the Dick Wolf years and the CSI years where it was about the case, not the cops. Now, I think with shows like Monk and The Mentalist, we're back to wanting to know about the person and understand their psyche and how it benefits the solving of the crime."

McCormack’s character has a disease that makes him see conversations and numbers and letters. McCormack wants to live up to the challenge of playing the part as true as he can to someone with the disease.

"I couldn't just arbitrarily make choices," McCormack said, according to the LA Times. "I had to make sure that when the hallucinations are written, I played those accurately and that they were true to the condition. I love any role that demands that kind of responsibility."

McCormack starred in the TNT show Trust Me a few years ago, but that was canceled after one season. His new show Perception premieres on Monday.

Photo courtesy Joseph Marzullo/WENN.com
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