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Miley Cyrus Wants to Break Away From Her Oversexualized Past

Allie Gemmill is an avid writer, cinephile, Ravenclaw, and pizza enthusiast. She regularly writes on film and television with a special focus on women’s involvement & influence in Hollywood. Additionally, she has bylines at Bustle, Keyfr...

Now, she's taking control of her image to make a positive change

It's been clear for some months now that Miley Cyrus really wants to start a new phase of her life. After making it clear she's done with the drugs and the stereotypes the go along with it, Cyrus is once again opening up about the ways in which she is controlling and refocusing her image. Now, Cyrus is speaking about feeling oversexualized early in her career, beginning with her days on Disney's Hannah Montana and seemingly following her through her album Bangerz.

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In a new interview with Harper's Bazaar, Cyrus reflected on her child star years, which notably began while she was starring on Hannah Montana. "There's so much I don't remember about being a child entertainer because it was so much to keep in my brain. It's like anything when you are in it. I didn't realize how much pressure I was under and how that shaped me until, like, this year."

This kind of reflection led to her pointing out the problematic issue of feeling controlled by the creative team on the show, which may have started this trend of expecting Cyrus to go further and further in pushing the envelope as she grew up. "People were so shocked by some of the things that I did. It should be more shocking that when I was 11 or 12, I was put in full hair and makeup, a wig, and told what to wear by a group of mostly older men. I didn't want to become any sort of man-hater because I love all humans; I am a humanitarian," she explained.

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She did note one lesson she learned from coming out of this period where she felt the pressure to be provocative or make hyper-sexualized statements with her clothes or behavior and moving into a more mature era. "Beyoncé said, 'Girls run the world,' and that was an important thing to say because I think subconsciously we are beaten down to believe that it isn't true our whole lives. It's no wonder that a lot of people lose their way and lose who they really are because they always have people telling them who to be."

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Of course, in true Cyrus fashion, there's still a little feistiness in her remarks as she details why she doesn't want her past to dictate how people perceive her in the present. "How can I fucking be the role model I'm supposed to be? Yeah, I just said fucking role model. Who gives a shit? Because I got my tits out before doesn't make me less of a role model. I think I show people that they can be themselves. I also think something that has been important for me, in this next little, like, transition phase of my career is that I don't give a fuck about being cool. I just want to be myself."

Cyrus' reflections seem to be having a positive effect in how she wants to control her image now. With new music out in the world and appearing to be very committed to issues around animal rights, around LGBTQ and women's rights and making sure her own career is where she wants it to be, Cyrus seems to be on a good path. This new era of a more authentic, empowered, mature Cyrus certainly looks intriguing.

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