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Steven Avery's comments about Teresa Halbach's family rubbed me the wrong way

Sarah grew up in Monterey, CA and now lives in Los Angeles. When she's not writing, you can find her enjoying a good book, fine wine, sunflowers and long walks on the beach.

Even if he didn't commit murder, shouldn't Steven Avery still show sympathy for the victim's family?

Let me first preface the following by saying I neither 100 percent believe Steven Avery is innocent, nor am I 100 percent sure he is guilty. I do believe that Avery's case in the 2005 murder of Teresa Halbach was completely bungled and that Avery was painted as a very sympathetic character in the Netflix documentary Making a Murderer.

However, lately Avery is starting to lose that sympathetic character status real quick, at least in my eyes.

In a recent statement to InTouch Weekly, Avery voiced his confidence that his new lawyer, Kathleen Zellner, will soon overturn his conviction, making him a free man once again. There's never anything wrong with a little confidence, especially if you are innocent of a heinous murder that you are currently doing time for, but the problem with Avery's recent words comes when he begins to talk about Halbach's family.

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"They went through just as much as I did and my family," Avery said when asked what he would say to the Halbachs, given the opportunity. "You know, I feel sorry for them, you know, for what they had to go through... Once the truth comes out, I think they'll regret what they all said about me."

Take a listen.

It's not even exactly what he says about the Halbachs, but the way he says it. There's no detection of sympathy in his voice, no remorse for what the Halbachs have gone through after the brutal murder of their daughter, who Avery — at the very least — was acquainted with.

Of course Avery's family has been through the ringer, and of course Halbach's family will undoubtedly feel terrible if Avery is ever proven 100 percent innocent, but that doesn't mean Avery shouldn't also feel for the the murder victim's loved ones.

If anything, the fact that Avery's family has been tortured through his two trials and incarcerations should make him more sympathetic to the grieving Halbachs.

Avery also recently attacked his former lawyers, Dean Strang and Jerome Buting, calling them negligent and saying they were the reason he lost his trial. He even went so far as to say that Buting and Strang should lose their licenses to practice law.

More: Making a Murderer's Dean Strang's heartthrob status makes him squirm

"Lawyers should loose there license when they don't investigate they case to proof there clients and they violating the ethics, the state sould take there license for good," Avery wrote in a letter to InTouch in July 2016, adding, "Dean and Jerome are Bad Attorneys... They don’t now what Justice is and they don’t now what is a investigation is because if they did they would have done it for a innocent man like me!!!"

Don't get me wrong, Avery has every right to be salty about being convicted once for a crime he definitely didn't commit and a second time for a crime he might not have committed; it just doesn't seem like he's directing his anger at the correct people right now. And if he wants to maintain public support, that's probably not a great idea.

What do you think? Will Avery's recent statements cause him to lose support from Making a Murderer fans?

Before you go, check out our slideshow below:

Even if he didn't commit murder, shouldn't Steven Avery still show sympathy for the victim's family?
Image: Netflix
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