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Beyoncé's dad reminds us why we shouldn't take her lyrics so literally

For Cailyn Cox, writing isn't just a hobby, it's her life. Passionate about Hollywood, she makes it her mission to find the most entertaining celebrity gossip for SheKnows readers. And when she's not enthralled in the celeb world, she's ...

Beyoncé isn't the only one who's been cheated on or had a rocky relationship, but that's why Lemonade so relatable

Beyoncé's fans are still on the hunt for Jay Z's alleged mistress, but while everyone is so concerned with finding "Becky," we've been missing the fact that her new album, Lemonade, is about so much more — luckily, we have Queen Bey's dad, Mathew Knowles, to remind us of that.

More: Move over Rachel Roy, it's Rita Ora that Beyoncé's fans have an issue with

During an interview with E! News, Knowles spoke about his daughter's new album (available on Tidal) and how it's so relatable for so many fans.

"I think that's the beauty of her creativity and I think that's what makes it so special, is that it relates to everyone," he told the outlet. "Every one of us have been disappointed before and have had to go through the grieving process of anger and, you know, disappointment and then acceptance and forgiveness. And I think that's why this again is touching so many people, because it's universal. Everybody can relate to it."

But, according to the site, he did comment on who Beyoncé was referring to in some of her "juicy lyrics" — the Beyhive have so far condemned everyone from Rachel Roy to Rita Ora for the lyrics from "Sorry," and Knowles previously addressed a passage from the Lemonade visual album in which Beyoncé recited a poem about being a "slave to the back of his hand" (Knowles made it perfectly clear that he had never hit his daughter but refused to speculate further).

More: Beyonce's dad insists he wasn't fired, he quit

"Let me tell you who she's talking about, can I tell you who she's talking about? She's talking about you," Knowles told E! News. "You put that in context for you personally. She's talking about you and everybody that is you, that's who she's talking about."

What we think he means by this is that not all the songs are autobiographical and should not be interpreted as such. Instead, fans should be focusing on the creativity of the project — which would make sense, since not all the lyrics were actually written by Beyoncé.

More: You can relax, Beyhive — Beyoncé & Jay Z are still going strong

What do you think? Are people over-examining Beyoncé's lyrics and missing the bigger picture? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below.

Before you go, check out our slideshow below.

Beyoncé isn't the only one who's been cheated on or had a rocky relationship, but that's why Lemonade so relatable
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