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2015 Oscars: 7 Amazing things about Graham Moore

Shanee Edwards is a screenwriter who earned her master's degree at UCLA Film School. She recently won the Next MacGyver television writing competition to create a TV show about a female engineer. Her TV pilot, Ada and the Machine, is cur...

The Imitation Game's screenwriter Graham Moore has message for young people

Meet Graham Moore, winner of the Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar for The Imitation Game. He's a terrific role model for young people who are struggling to accept themselves, so here are seven reasons we think you'll adore him as much as we do.

1. Graham Moore thanked Oprah

Imagine how exciting it would be to not only win an Oscar, but have it delivered to you by Oprah Winfrey. Well, that's what happened to The Imitation Game's screenwriter at last night's Oscars. When Moore accepted the statue, he said, "Thank you, Academy and thank you, Oprah." Too cute!

More: Emma Watson crushes on Steve Carell for supporting #HeForShe at the Oscars

2. He gave out some excellent advice

During Moore's Oscar acceptance speech, he told the people watching to, "Stay weird. Stay different." We think that's a wonderfully positive message since everyone has something about them that makes them different.

The Imitation Game's screenwriter Graham Moore has message for young people

3. The screenwriter wanted to honor the tragic life of Alan Turing

Moore has been obsessed with Alan Turing since he was a teen. Moore admired Turing because he and his team of code-breakers helped defeat the Nazis in World War II. The formidable German Enigma machine encoded war messages that gave crucial information like the day and location of specific troops and battle attacks. After building a giant computer he fondly called "Christopher," Turing and the Brits were finally able to solve the cypher and help the Allied troops to win the war.

The Imitation Game's screenwriter Graham Moore has message for young people

Image: The Weinstein Co.

4. Moore unsuccessfully pitched the biopic in Hollywood numerous times

After trying over and over to get a production company to fund his movie idea about a gay mathematician from World War II, Moore nearly lost hope. It was at a party where he discovered producer Nora Grossman had optioned a book about the life of Turing. After much begging and pleading, he was allowed to write the script on spec. The rest is history.

More: 2015 Oscars winners: See the complete list here live!

5. The screenplay was personal for Moore

In his Oscar speech, Moore revealed that he tried to take his own life when he was just 16 years old because he thought he'd never fit in. He clearly relates to Alan Turing, who felt the very same way in the movie. We're so happy Moore stuck out the hard times and used his pain to create such beautiful art.

The Imitation Game's screenwriter Graham Moore has message for young people

Image: The Weinstein Co.

6. Turing's important life humbled Moore

In a recent interview, Moore recently told ScreenwritingU, "I was nervous to start writing. I knew how important [Turing's life] was for people. I really did not want to be the guy who screwed that up." We say you got it absolutely right.

More: Julie Andrews cries, embraces Lady Gaga after her amazing Oscar tribute (VIDEO)

7. Moore channeled the voice of Alan Turing

It was very important to Moore that the story felt like it was being told by Turing himself, so the first words he wrote were Turing's monologue that Benedict Cumberbatch delivers so wonderfully in the movie. The monologue starts with, "Are you paying attention?" The whole world is paying attention now, Graham Moore. Congrats!

The Imitation Game also stars Keira Knightley, Matthew Goode and Charles Dance.

Watch Graham Moore's speech:

The Imitation Game's screenwriter Graham Moore has message for young people

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