The Value Of Play For Children

6 years ago

The Value Of Play For Children


The value of play is considered so important to child development that it has been recognised by the United Nations High Commission for Human Rights as a right of every child.

From birth, children actively learn from observing and participating with other children and adults, especially their parents and care-givers. Play is crucial to their development as they learn through playing how to understand their surroundings, interact with others and to express and control their emotions. Alongside expanding their knowledge and skills, their cognitive(intellectual) development is supported by play.

The Value Of Play Is Fully Researched

Many renowned theorists like John Dewey, Maria Montessori and Jean Piaget agree that children learn from doing, therefore what better way to learn than through play, which actively beckons children with no restraints, just a safe environment in which to do so.

The Value Of Play Is Simple

A simple game/learning experience I created which children love to play is called ‘Catch the Bouncing Ball’. All I use are different coloured plastic cups, stickers and some ping pong balls. The object of the game is to bounce your ball and try and catch it in your cup. Whilst playing catch the bouncing ball many areas of development are being enhanced. Language as we talk about the colours of the cups and discuss what sticker they would like on their ball. Physical gross motor skills are being developed as they bounce the ball and run around trying to catch it. Cognitive Development as some children start to realise if you bounce the ball lightly it is easier to catch. Social Skills as they play together and try to help each other, all the while having heaps of fun and laughter.

Play is necessary to every aspect of a child’s development because it is instrumental to their intellectual, physical, language, creativity and emotional and social domains of development. It is such an appropriate way of learning because children want to play; it is not forced but openly available to them to experience freely at any time.

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